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Article: Diversity in tropical ecosystems: The species richness and turnover of moths in Malaysian rainforests

TitleDiversity in tropical ecosystems: The species richness and turnover of moths in Malaysian rainforests
Authors
KeywordsRichness estimators
Alpha diversity
Beta diversity
Lepidoptera
Moths
Tropical rainforest
Issue Date2015
Citation
Insect Conservation and Diversity, 2015, v. 8, n. 2, p. 132-142 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2014 The Royal Entomological Society. As a contribution to accurate estimation of arthropod alpha and beta diversities in tropical forests, we present results of some of the largest moth samples ever collected in the Malaysian region. To estimate alpha diversity, light traps were run at three geographically distinct locations. We generated individual-based and coverage-based rarefaction curves to estimate sampling sufficiency and alpha diversity of the locations. Despite a large number of moths collected (67 282 individuals, from three locations), none of the rarefaction curves reached asymptote. The species accumulation curves based on the Chao1 richness estimator at each location suggested that, even when sampling yielded over 30 000 individuals, Chao1 could not reliably estimate the observed number of species. In one of the three locations, moths were collected systematically by light traps in 1979-1980 and 2000-2001. Despite over 160 trapping nights and 16 500 individuals collected in total, the estimated total number of species (2262) was well below the general collection conducted at the same location over a 35-year period [3921 species (1975-2013)]. Beta diversity was investigated using the samples collected at one location on two occasions over a 20-year period. The faunal composition has changed over the 20-year period, possibly as a result of extensive land-use change around the study location. We estimated the minimum sampling effort required to detect such changes by calculating type II errors. Unlike alpha diversity estimation, we found that only four replicate samples, each with only two trapping nights, would be sufficient to reliably detect changes in assemblage composition.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/251093
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 3.182
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.061
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAshton, Louise A.-
dc.contributor.authorBarlow, Henry S.-
dc.contributor.authorNakamura, Akihiro-
dc.contributor.authorKitching, Roger L.-
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-01T01:54:33Z-
dc.date.available2018-02-01T01:54:33Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationInsect Conservation and Diversity, 2015, v. 8, n. 2, p. 132-142-
dc.identifier.issn1752-458X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/251093-
dc.description.abstract© 2014 The Royal Entomological Society. As a contribution to accurate estimation of arthropod alpha and beta diversities in tropical forests, we present results of some of the largest moth samples ever collected in the Malaysian region. To estimate alpha diversity, light traps were run at three geographically distinct locations. We generated individual-based and coverage-based rarefaction curves to estimate sampling sufficiency and alpha diversity of the locations. Despite a large number of moths collected (67 282 individuals, from three locations), none of the rarefaction curves reached asymptote. The species accumulation curves based on the Chao1 richness estimator at each location suggested that, even when sampling yielded over 30 000 individuals, Chao1 could not reliably estimate the observed number of species. In one of the three locations, moths were collected systematically by light traps in 1979-1980 and 2000-2001. Despite over 160 trapping nights and 16 500 individuals collected in total, the estimated total number of species (2262) was well below the general collection conducted at the same location over a 35-year period [3921 species (1975-2013)]. Beta diversity was investigated using the samples collected at one location on two occasions over a 20-year period. The faunal composition has changed over the 20-year period, possibly as a result of extensive land-use change around the study location. We estimated the minimum sampling effort required to detect such changes by calculating type II errors. Unlike alpha diversity estimation, we found that only four replicate samples, each with only two trapping nights, would be sufficient to reliably detect changes in assemblage composition.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofInsect Conservation and Diversity-
dc.subjectRichness estimators-
dc.subjectAlpha diversity-
dc.subjectBeta diversity-
dc.subjectLepidoptera-
dc.subjectMoths-
dc.subjectTropical rainforest-
dc.titleDiversity in tropical ecosystems: The species richness and turnover of moths in Malaysian rainforests-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/icad.12090-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84924294208-
dc.identifier.volume8-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage132-
dc.identifier.epage142-
dc.identifier.eissn1752-4598-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000351085900004-
dc.identifier.issnl1752-458X-

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