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Article: Forests and Their Canopies: Achievements and Horizons in Canopy Science

TitleForests and Their Canopies: Achievements and Horizons in Canopy Science
Authors
Keywordsfood webs
remote sensing
biodiversity
biogeochemical cycle
canopy
cranes
Issue Date2017
Citation
Trends in Ecology and Evolution, 2017, v. 32, n. 6, p. 438-451 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2017 The Authors Forest canopies are dynamic interfaces between organisms and atmosphere, providing buffered microclimates and complex microhabitats. Canopies form vertically stratified ecosystems interconnected with other strata. Some forest biodiversity patterns and food webs have been documented and measurements of ecophysiology and biogeochemical cycling have allowed analyses of large-scale transfer of CO 2 , water, and trace gases between forests and the atmosphere. However, many knowledge gaps remain. With global research networks and databases, and new technologies and infrastructure, we envisage rapid advances in our understanding of the mechanisms that drive the spatial and temporal dynamics of forests and their canopies. Such understanding is vital for the successful management and conservation of global forests and the ecosystem services they provide to the world.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/251210
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 17.712
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 6.476
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNakamura, Akihiro-
dc.contributor.authorKitching, Roger L.-
dc.contributor.authorCao, Min-
dc.contributor.authorCreedy, Thomas J.-
dc.contributor.authorFayle, Tom M.-
dc.contributor.authorFreiberg, Martin-
dc.contributor.authorHewitt, C. N.-
dc.contributor.authorItioka, Takao-
dc.contributor.authorKoh, Lian Pin-
dc.contributor.authorMa, Keping-
dc.contributor.authorMalhi, Yadvinder-
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Andrew-
dc.contributor.authorNovotny, Vojtech-
dc.contributor.authorOzanne, Claire M.P.-
dc.contributor.authorSong, Liang-
dc.contributor.authorWang, Han-
dc.contributor.authorAshton, Louise A.-
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-01T01:54:54Z-
dc.date.available2018-02-01T01:54:54Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationTrends in Ecology and Evolution, 2017, v. 32, n. 6, p. 438-451-
dc.identifier.issn0169-5347-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/251210-
dc.description.abstract© 2017 The Authors Forest canopies are dynamic interfaces between organisms and atmosphere, providing buffered microclimates and complex microhabitats. Canopies form vertically stratified ecosystems interconnected with other strata. Some forest biodiversity patterns and food webs have been documented and measurements of ecophysiology and biogeochemical cycling have allowed analyses of large-scale transfer of CO 2 , water, and trace gases between forests and the atmosphere. However, many knowledge gaps remain. With global research networks and databases, and new technologies and infrastructure, we envisage rapid advances in our understanding of the mechanisms that drive the spatial and temporal dynamics of forests and their canopies. Such understanding is vital for the successful management and conservation of global forests and the ecosystem services they provide to the world.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofTrends in Ecology and Evolution-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectfood webs-
dc.subjectremote sensing-
dc.subjectbiodiversity-
dc.subjectbiogeochemical cycle-
dc.subjectcanopy-
dc.subjectcranes-
dc.titleForests and Their Canopies: Achievements and Horizons in Canopy Science-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.tree.2017.02.020-
dc.identifier.pmid28359572-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85016731543-
dc.identifier.volume32-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage438-
dc.identifier.epage451-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000401514600006-
dc.identifier.issnl0169-5347-

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