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Article: The Environmental Exposures and Inner- and Intercity Traffic Flows of the Metro System May Contribute to the Skin Microbiome and Resistome

TitleThe Environmental Exposures and Inner- and Intercity Traffic Flows of the Metro System May Contribute to the Skin Microbiome and Resistome
Authors
Keywordsantibiotic resistance gene
ARG
ARG transmission
metagenomics
Metro system
microbial signature
microbiome
recurrence
skin
Issue Date2018
PublisherElsevier (Cell Press): OAJ. The Journal's web site is located at http://cell.com/cell-reports
Citation
Cell Reports, 2018, v. 24 n. 5, p. 1190-1202.e5 How to Cite?
AbstractThe skin functions as the primary interface between the human body and the external environment. To understand how the microbiome varies within urban mass transit and influences the skin microbiota, we profiled the human palm microbiome after contact with handrails within the Hong Kong Mass Transit Railway (MTR) system. Intraday sampling time was identified as the primary determinant of the variation and recurrence of the community composition, whereas human-associated species and clinically important antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) were captured as p.m. signatures. Line-specific signatures were notably correlated with line-specific environmental exposures and city characteristics. The sole cross-border line appeared as an outlier in most analyses and showed high relative abundance and a significant intraday increment of clinically important ARGs (24.1%), suggesting potential cross-border ARG transmission, especially for tetracycline and vancomycin resistance. Our study provides an important reference for future public health strategies to mitigate intracity and cross-border pathogen and ARG transmission.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/258509
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 9.423
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 8.588
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKANG, K-
dc.contributor.authorNI, Y-
dc.contributor.authorLi, J-
dc.contributor.authorImamovic, L-
dc.contributor.authorSarkar, C-
dc.contributor.authorKobler, MD-
dc.contributor.authorHeshiki, Y-
dc.contributor.authorZheng, T-
dc.contributor.authorKumari, S-
dc.contributor.authorWong, CY-
dc.contributor.authorAnand, A-
dc.contributor.authorWong, CWM-
dc.contributor.authorDingle, CE-
dc.contributor.authorDenizen, S-
dc.contributor.authorBaker, DM-
dc.contributor.authorSommer, MOA-
dc.contributor.authorWebster, CJ-
dc.contributor.authorPanagiotou, I-
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-22T01:39:40Z-
dc.date.available2018-08-22T01:39:40Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationCell Reports, 2018, v. 24 n. 5, p. 1190-1202.e5-
dc.identifier.issn2211-1247-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/258509-
dc.description.abstractThe skin functions as the primary interface between the human body and the external environment. To understand how the microbiome varies within urban mass transit and influences the skin microbiota, we profiled the human palm microbiome after contact with handrails within the Hong Kong Mass Transit Railway (MTR) system. Intraday sampling time was identified as the primary determinant of the variation and recurrence of the community composition, whereas human-associated species and clinically important antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) were captured as p.m. signatures. Line-specific signatures were notably correlated with line-specific environmental exposures and city characteristics. The sole cross-border line appeared as an outlier in most analyses and showed high relative abundance and a significant intraday increment of clinically important ARGs (24.1%), suggesting potential cross-border ARG transmission, especially for tetracycline and vancomycin resistance. Our study provides an important reference for future public health strategies to mitigate intracity and cross-border pathogen and ARG transmission.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier (Cell Press): OAJ. The Journal's web site is located at http://cell.com/cell-reports-
dc.relation.ispartofCell Reports-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectantibiotic resistance gene-
dc.subjectARG-
dc.subjectARG transmission-
dc.subjectmetagenomics-
dc.subjectMetro system-
dc.subjectmicrobial signature-
dc.subjectmicrobiome-
dc.subjectrecurrence-
dc.subjectskin-
dc.titleThe Environmental Exposures and Inner- and Intercity Traffic Flows of the Metro System May Contribute to the Skin Microbiome and Resistome-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailSarkar, C: csarkar@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailKumari, S: sarikak@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailDingle, CE: cdingle@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailBaker, DM: dmbaker@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWebster, CJ: cwebster@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPanagiotou, I: gipa@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authoritySarkar, C=rp01980-
dc.identifier.authorityDingle, CE=rp01985-
dc.identifier.authorityBaker, DM=rp01712-
dc.identifier.authorityWebster, CJ=rp01747-
dc.identifier.authorityPanagiotou, I=rp01725-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.celrep.2018.06.109-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85050313458-
dc.identifier.hkuros287725-
dc.identifier.volume24-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage1190-
dc.identifier.epage1202.e5-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000440377500010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.identifier.issnl2211-1247-

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