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Article: Time to Treatment in Patients With Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

TitleTime to Treatment in Patients With Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer
Authors
Keywordstreatment delay
Stage III
overall survival
Non-small cell lung cancer
time to treatment
Issue Date2009
Citation
International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, 2009, v. 74, n. 3, p. 790-795 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: To determine whether time to treatment (TTT) has an effect on overall survival (OS) in patients with unresectable or medically inoperable Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and whether patient or treatment factors are associated with TTT. Methods and Materials: Included in the study were 237 consecutive patients with Stage III NSCLC treated at University of Michigan Hospital (UM) or the Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System (VA). Patients were treated with either palliative or definitive radiotherapy and radiotherapy alone (n = 106) or either sequential (n = 69) or concurrent chemoradiation (n = 62). The primary endpoint was OS. Results: Median follow-up was 69 months, and median TTT was 57 days. On univariate analysis, the risk of death did not increase significantly with longer TTT (p = 0.093). However, subset analysis showed that there was a higher risk of death with longer TTT in patients who survived ≥ 5 years (p = 0.029). Younger age (p = 0.027), male sex (p = 0.013), lower Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) (p = 0.002), and treatment at the VA (p = 0.001) were significantly associated with longer TTT. However, on multivariate analysis, only lower KPS remained significantly associated with longer TTT (p = 0.003). Conclusion: Time to treatment is significantly associated with OS in patients with Stage III NSCLC who lived longer than 5 years, although it is not a significant factor in Stage III patients as a whole. Lower KPS is associated with longer TTT. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/266897
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 7.038
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.117
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, Li-
dc.contributor.authorCorrea, Candace R.-
dc.contributor.authorHayman, James A.-
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Lujun-
dc.contributor.authorCease, Kemp-
dc.contributor.authorBrenner, Dean-
dc.contributor.authorArenberg, Doug-
dc.contributor.authorCurtis, Jeffery-
dc.contributor.authorKalemkerian, Gregory P.-
dc.contributor.authorKong, Feng Ming-
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-31T07:19:55Z-
dc.date.available2019-01-31T07:19:55Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, 2009, v. 74, n. 3, p. 790-795-
dc.identifier.issn0360-3016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/266897-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To determine whether time to treatment (TTT) has an effect on overall survival (OS) in patients with unresectable or medically inoperable Stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and whether patient or treatment factors are associated with TTT. Methods and Materials: Included in the study were 237 consecutive patients with Stage III NSCLC treated at University of Michigan Hospital (UM) or the Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System (VA). Patients were treated with either palliative or definitive radiotherapy and radiotherapy alone (n = 106) or either sequential (n = 69) or concurrent chemoradiation (n = 62). The primary endpoint was OS. Results: Median follow-up was 69 months, and median TTT was 57 days. On univariate analysis, the risk of death did not increase significantly with longer TTT (p = 0.093). However, subset analysis showed that there was a higher risk of death with longer TTT in patients who survived ≥ 5 years (p = 0.029). Younger age (p = 0.027), male sex (p = 0.013), lower Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS) (p = 0.002), and treatment at the VA (p = 0.001) were significantly associated with longer TTT. However, on multivariate analysis, only lower KPS remained significantly associated with longer TTT (p = 0.003). Conclusion: Time to treatment is significantly associated with OS in patients with Stage III NSCLC who lived longer than 5 years, although it is not a significant factor in Stage III patients as a whole. Lower KPS is associated with longer TTT. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics-
dc.subjecttreatment delay-
dc.subjectStage III-
dc.subjectoverall survival-
dc.subjectNon-small cell lung cancer-
dc.subjecttime to treatment-
dc.titleTime to Treatment in Patients With Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijrobp.2008.08.039-
dc.identifier.pmid19231108-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-67049107509-
dc.identifier.volume74-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage790-
dc.identifier.epage795-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000266754800020-
dc.identifier.issnl0360-3016-

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