File Download
Supplementary

postgraduate thesis: Professional failure and the degradation of international humanitarian law : narcissist responses to the post 9/11 so-called war on terrorism

TitleProfessional failure and the degradation of international humanitarian law : narcissist responses to the post 9/11 so-called war on terrorism
Authors
Advisors
Advisor(s):Fu, HCarty, JA
Issue Date2016
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Lim, A. J.. (2016). Professional failure and the degradation of international humanitarian law : narcissist responses to the post 9/11 so-called war on terrorism. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR.
AbstractThe profession of the soldier and the international humanitarian lawyer carries particular responsibility with regard to the law of armed conflict. The understanding and implementation of the law depend heavily on these two professions. Among others, their task is to identify and realize the law’s overarching meta-juridical principle of humanity, in theory and in practice on the battlefield. Yet, the frequent violations of the law and the lack of academic responses to them pose a constant challenge to both professions. The present work detects ‘self-orientedness’ and narcissism in soldiers and humanitarian lawyers that stand in blatant opposition to the dictates of the law’s meta-juridical principle of humanity. This meta-principle consists of three specific mental and emotional processes, empathy, compassion and self-constraint. Yet, ultimately the two professions’ submission to narcissism signifies the professional failure that resulted and manifested itself in the scandals and events surrounding the so-called war on terrorism. This professional failure also explains the aesthetic approach to research, and to the academic and professional responsibility. At the same time it reveals the soldiers’ and lawyers’ inhibition to undergo specific mental and emotional processes required by the meta-principle of the law. Despite the described professional failure by soldiers and lawyers, the crucial and potential role of the individual in this dynamic is emphasized through an analysis of the legal advice provided by a few individuals and the dissection of key moments on the battlefield when violations of the law are committed. Finally, Kierkegaard’s philosophy counters the encroaching ‘self-orientedness’ and idiosyncratic effects of narcissism by calling for individual moral responsibility through choice. Therein, an alternative approach is offered to understanding the law of armed conflict and improving its implementation and compliance with it.
DegreeDoctor of Philosophy
SubjectInternational humanitarian law
Dept/ProgramLaw
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/268390

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.advisorFu, H-
dc.contributor.advisorCarty, JA-
dc.contributor.authorLim, A-Jull-
dc.date.accessioned2019-03-21T00:55:06Z-
dc.date.available2019-03-21T00:55:06Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationLim, A. J.. (2016). Professional failure and the degradation of international humanitarian law : narcissist responses to the post 9/11 so-called war on terrorism. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR.-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/268390-
dc.description.abstractThe profession of the soldier and the international humanitarian lawyer carries particular responsibility with regard to the law of armed conflict. The understanding and implementation of the law depend heavily on these two professions. Among others, their task is to identify and realize the law’s overarching meta-juridical principle of humanity, in theory and in practice on the battlefield. Yet, the frequent violations of the law and the lack of academic responses to them pose a constant challenge to both professions. The present work detects ‘self-orientedness’ and narcissism in soldiers and humanitarian lawyers that stand in blatant opposition to the dictates of the law’s meta-juridical principle of humanity. This meta-principle consists of three specific mental and emotional processes, empathy, compassion and self-constraint. Yet, ultimately the two professions’ submission to narcissism signifies the professional failure that resulted and manifested itself in the scandals and events surrounding the so-called war on terrorism. This professional failure also explains the aesthetic approach to research, and to the academic and professional responsibility. At the same time it reveals the soldiers’ and lawyers’ inhibition to undergo specific mental and emotional processes required by the meta-principle of the law. Despite the described professional failure by soldiers and lawyers, the crucial and potential role of the individual in this dynamic is emphasized through an analysis of the legal advice provided by a few individuals and the dissection of key moments on the battlefield when violations of the law are committed. Finally, Kierkegaard’s philosophy counters the encroaching ‘self-orientedness’ and idiosyncratic effects of narcissism by calling for individual moral responsibility through choice. Therein, an alternative approach is offered to understanding the law of armed conflict and improving its implementation and compliance with it. -
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subject.lcshInternational humanitarian law-
dc.titleProfessional failure and the degradation of international humanitarian law : narcissist responses to the post 9/11 so-called war on terrorism-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Philosophy-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineLaw-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.date.hkucongregation2016-
dc.identifier.mmsid991044091308503414-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats