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Article: Quantifying terrestrial carbon in freshwater food webs using amino acid isotope analysis: case study with an endemic cavefish

TitleQuantifying terrestrial carbon in freshwater food webs using amino acid isotope analysis: case study with an endemic cavefish
Authors
KeywordsAllochthonous organic carbon ;;; Food webs ;;; Species interactions ;;; Terrestrial carbon
Amino acid-specific isotope analysis
Aquatic ecosystems
Carbon cycle
Community ecology
Issue Date2019
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)2041-210X
Citation
Methods in Ecology and Evolution, 2019, v. 10 n. 9, p. 1594-1605 How to Cite?
Abstract1. Flow of terrestrial carbon though aquatic ecosystems (allochthony) is an important but underestimated component of the global carbon cycle. A lack of clear consensus about the importance of allochthonous (terrestrial) organic carbon is sometimes attributed to uncertainties associated with conventional ‘bulk’ isotope data, the most widely used ecological tracer. 2. Amino acid‐specific isotope analysis is an emerging research method promising to address existing limitations of bulk C and N isotope analyses. We tested the efficacy of amino acid δ13C data as a generalizable measure of allochthony by analysing an aggregated dataset (n = 168) of primary and secondary data of carbon sources from disparate geographical locations across the globe. 3. We found the δ13C fingerprints amino acids to be consistently distinct between allochthonous (terrestrial) and autochthonous (aquatic) carbon sources. We also found that our approach is most effective when we use only essential amino acid tracers (i.e. isoleucine, leucine, phenylalanine, threonine and valine). Predictive trends in δ13C fingerprints appear to be largely compatible across studies and/or laboratories. 4. As a case study, we used this approach to quantify the contribution of terrestrial carbon to an endemic cavefish, Cryptotora thamicola, and found that its biomass was comprised largely of autochthonous carbon (~75%).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/272493
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 7.781
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.513
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiew, JH-
dc.contributor.authorChua, KWJ-
dc.contributor.authorArsenault, ER-
dc.contributor.authorThorp, JH-
dc.contributor.authorSuvarnaraksha, A-
dc.contributor.authorAmirrudin, A-
dc.contributor.authorYeo, DCJ-
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-20T10:43:22Z-
dc.date.available2019-07-20T10:43:22Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationMethods in Ecology and Evolution, 2019, v. 10 n. 9, p. 1594-1605-
dc.identifier.issn2041-210X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/272493-
dc.description.abstract1. Flow of terrestrial carbon though aquatic ecosystems (allochthony) is an important but underestimated component of the global carbon cycle. A lack of clear consensus about the importance of allochthonous (terrestrial) organic carbon is sometimes attributed to uncertainties associated with conventional ‘bulk’ isotope data, the most widely used ecological tracer. 2. Amino acid‐specific isotope analysis is an emerging research method promising to address existing limitations of bulk C and N isotope analyses. We tested the efficacy of amino acid δ13C data as a generalizable measure of allochthony by analysing an aggregated dataset (n = 168) of primary and secondary data of carbon sources from disparate geographical locations across the globe. 3. We found the δ13C fingerprints amino acids to be consistently distinct between allochthonous (terrestrial) and autochthonous (aquatic) carbon sources. We also found that our approach is most effective when we use only essential amino acid tracers (i.e. isoleucine, leucine, phenylalanine, threonine and valine). Predictive trends in δ13C fingerprints appear to be largely compatible across studies and/or laboratories. 4. As a case study, we used this approach to quantify the contribution of terrestrial carbon to an endemic cavefish, Cryptotora thamicola, and found that its biomass was comprised largely of autochthonous carbon (~75%).-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)2041-210X-
dc.relation.ispartofMethods in Ecology and Evolution-
dc.rightsThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Methods in Ecology and Evolution, 2019, v. 10 n. 9, p. 1594-1605, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/2041-210X.13230. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.subjectAllochthonous organic carbon ;;; Food webs ;;; Species interactions ;;; Terrestrial carbon-
dc.subjectAmino acid-specific isotope analysis-
dc.subjectAquatic ecosystems-
dc.subjectCarbon cycle-
dc.subjectCommunity ecology-
dc.titleQuantifying terrestrial carbon in freshwater food webs using amino acid isotope analysis: case study with an endemic cavefish-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLiew, JH: jhliew@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/2041-210X.13230-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85068237800-
dc.identifier.hkuros298573-
dc.identifier.volume10-
dc.identifier.issue9-
dc.identifier.spage1594-
dc.identifier.epage1605-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000483699600020-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.issnl2041-210X-

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