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Book Chapter: Palaeo-records of histories of deoxygenation and its ecosystem impact

TitlePalaeo-records of histories of deoxygenation and its ecosystem impact
Authors
KeywordsBleaching
Calcification
Climate change
Dead zones
Hyperoxia
Issue Date2019
PublisherIUCN
Citation
Palaeo-records of histories of deoxygenation and its ecosystem impact. In Laffoley, D. and Baxter, J:M: (Eds.), Ocean deoxygenation: Everyone’s problem, p. 213-224. : IUCN, 2019 How to Cite?
AbstractCoral reefs are suffering unprecedented declines worldwide. Most studies focus on stressors such as rising temperatures, nutrient pollution, overfishing, and ocean acidification as drivers of this degradation. However, recent mass mortality events associated with low oxygen on coral reefs indicate that oxygen is a critical factor that can be limiting in reef environments. Here, we present evidence that integrates across disciplines and perspectives to reveal how natural and anthropogenic factors drive variation in oxygen at multiple scales on coral reefs. This variation, in turn, limits essential processes such as productivity, respiration, and calcification on reefs and often plays a role in the outcome of interactions between corals and their competitors, pathogens, and mutualists. Moreover, the apparent effects of temperature, eutrophication, acidification, and other stressors on corals are commonly mediated by oxygen. As a consequence, the imprint of oxygen variation is evident in many patterns including reef biodiversity, coral bleaching, colony morphology, and fish behavior. We suggest that the structure and dynamics of coral reefs can be fully understood only by considering the ubiquitous role of oxygen, and we identify critical areas of future oxygen research to guide the study and management of coral reefs in a changing world.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/273360
ISBN
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 3.902
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.287
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYasuhara, M-
dc.contributor.authorRabalais, NN-
dc.contributor.authorConley, DJ-
dc.contributor.authorGutiérrez, D-
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-06T09:27:25Z-
dc.date.available2019-08-06T09:27:25Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationPalaeo-records of histories of deoxygenation and its ecosystem impact. In Laffoley, D. and Baxter, J:M: (Eds.), Ocean deoxygenation: Everyone’s problem, p. 213-224. : IUCN, 2019-
dc.identifier.isbn9782831720135-
dc.identifier.issn0722-4028-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/273360-
dc.description.abstractCoral reefs are suffering unprecedented declines worldwide. Most studies focus on stressors such as rising temperatures, nutrient pollution, overfishing, and ocean acidification as drivers of this degradation. However, recent mass mortality events associated with low oxygen on coral reefs indicate that oxygen is a critical factor that can be limiting in reef environments. Here, we present evidence that integrates across disciplines and perspectives to reveal how natural and anthropogenic factors drive variation in oxygen at multiple scales on coral reefs. This variation, in turn, limits essential processes such as productivity, respiration, and calcification on reefs and often plays a role in the outcome of interactions between corals and their competitors, pathogens, and mutualists. Moreover, the apparent effects of temperature, eutrophication, acidification, and other stressors on corals are commonly mediated by oxygen. As a consequence, the imprint of oxygen variation is evident in many patterns including reef biodiversity, coral bleaching, colony morphology, and fish behavior. We suggest that the structure and dynamics of coral reefs can be fully understood only by considering the ubiquitous role of oxygen, and we identify critical areas of future oxygen research to guide the study and management of coral reefs in a changing world.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherIUCN-
dc.relation.ispartofOcean deoxygenation: Everyone’s problem-
dc.subjectBleaching-
dc.subjectCalcification-
dc.subjectClimate change-
dc.subjectDead zones-
dc.subjectHyperoxia-
dc.titlePalaeo-records of histories of deoxygenation and its ecosystem impact-
dc.typeBook_Chapter-
dc.identifier.emailYasuhara, M: yasuhara@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYasuhara, M=rp01474-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00338-019-01765-0-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85060526792-
dc.identifier.hkuros300486-
dc.identifier.spage213-
dc.identifier.epage224-
dc.identifier.eissn1432-0975-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000464842300001-
dc.identifier.issnl0722-4028-

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