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Article: Chinese adults’ nutrition label literacy in Hong Kong: Implications for nurses

TitleChinese adults’ nutrition label literacy in Hong Kong: Implications for nurses
Authors
Keywordsdemographic factors
food label
Hong Kong
nutrition education
nutrition label literacy
Issue Date2019
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/NHS
Citation
Nursing and Health Sciences, 2019, v. 21 n. 2, p. 171-177 How to Cite?
AbstractThe study aimed to investigate Chinese adults' nutrition label literacy in Hong Kong. It employed a web-based survey with structured questions. A total of 368 Chinese adults aged 18-59 participated in the survey and their nutrition label literacy was measured by the Newest Vital Sign (NVS). About two-thirds (68%) of the participants had limited nutrition literacy skills. Although they were able to identify correctly the calorie and sugar content of food products, 44% and 48% of them had difficulty in determining the consumption of calories and serving food sizes respectively. Another finding from the survey was that those with lower education level and of older age had significantly lower mean nutrition label literacy scores, which indicated that they were at higher risk for food insecurity. The findings showed that the nutrition label literacy level of Hong Kong's general public is quite low. This study can provide insights for nurses and healthcare professionals on how to educate people with lower education level and/or of advanced age to use nutrition labels more effectively and to further nutrition label literacy study and research, particularly in Hong Kong. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/274326
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 1.857
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.619
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLaw, QPS-
dc.contributor.authorYau, AHY-
dc.contributor.authorChung, JWY-
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-18T14:59:31Z-
dc.date.available2019-08-18T14:59:31Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationNursing and Health Sciences, 2019, v. 21 n. 2, p. 171-177-
dc.identifier.issn1441-0745-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/274326-
dc.description.abstractThe study aimed to investigate Chinese adults' nutrition label literacy in Hong Kong. It employed a web-based survey with structured questions. A total of 368 Chinese adults aged 18-59 participated in the survey and their nutrition label literacy was measured by the Newest Vital Sign (NVS). About two-thirds (68%) of the participants had limited nutrition literacy skills. Although they were able to identify correctly the calorie and sugar content of food products, 44% and 48% of them had difficulty in determining the consumption of calories and serving food sizes respectively. Another finding from the survey was that those with lower education level and of older age had significantly lower mean nutrition label literacy scores, which indicated that they were at higher risk for food insecurity. The findings showed that the nutrition label literacy level of Hong Kong's general public is quite low. This study can provide insights for nurses and healthcare professionals on how to educate people with lower education level and/or of advanced age to use nutrition labels more effectively and to further nutrition label literacy study and research, particularly in Hong Kong. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/NHS-
dc.relation.ispartofNursing and Health Sciences-
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subjectdemographic factors-
dc.subjectfood label-
dc.subjectHong Kong-
dc.subjectnutrition education-
dc.subjectnutrition label literacy-
dc.titleChinese adults’ nutrition label literacy in Hong Kong: Implications for nurses-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailYau, AHY: aliceyhy@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/nhs.12575-
dc.identifier.pmid30345724-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85055292042-
dc.identifier.hkuros302002-
dc.identifier.volume21-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage171-
dc.identifier.epage177-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000470972600006-
dc.publisher.placeAustralia-
dc.identifier.issnl1441-0745-

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