File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Problems and prospects of revitalizing marine pearl cultivation in highly urbanized coasts: A case study of Tolo Harbour in Hong Kong

TitleProblems and prospects of revitalizing marine pearl cultivation in highly urbanized coasts: A case study of Tolo Harbour in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsPearl farming
Mariculture
Sustainable fisheries
Biofiltration
Issue Date2019
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www,journals.elsevier.com/regional-studies-in-marine-science
Citation
Regional Studies in Marine Science, 2019, v. 31, p. article no. 100756 How to Cite?
AbstractPearl farming is part of Hong Kong's maritime heritage. Its history in the territory can be traced back irregularly for over a millennium, focussed on what was then known as the Tai Po Sea (now Tolo Harbour (Tolo Gang). For a short period in the 10th century AD Southern Han (during the turbulent Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period, the pearl farming became a tightly guarded Imperial monopoly. Thereafter the detail is uncertain but pearl fishing would seem to have continued, if not on a large scale, until the British annexation of the New Territories in 1898, although the centre of gravity, focussed on edible oysters, had moved to Deep Bay. An attempt was made to begin a cultivated pearl industry in Tolo Harbour in the 1960s but it failed. In this paper we seek to reconstruct the history of that episode and reveal the reasons why the ventures failed based on interviews with participants, newspaper clippings, government records and records kept by the Hong Kong Heritage Project. Despite government support, key failings were an inability to find the way to cultivate oysters in Hong Kong and a deficiency of wild pearl oysters available for grafting. Based on this historical lesson, the feasibility of revitalizing the pearl cultivation industry in highly urbanized coastal cities like Hong Kong, including improvements to water quality via biofiltration, are evaluated and discussed. Some recommendations are made for enabling the industry to be viable and sustainable. (C) 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/277370
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 1.624
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.464
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYAN, WT-
dc.contributor.authorLau, CP-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KMY-
dc.contributor.authorDavies, SNG-
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-20T08:49:46Z-
dc.date.available2019-09-20T08:49:46Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationRegional Studies in Marine Science, 2019, v. 31, p. article no. 100756-
dc.identifier.issn2352-4855-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/277370-
dc.description.abstractPearl farming is part of Hong Kong's maritime heritage. Its history in the territory can be traced back irregularly for over a millennium, focussed on what was then known as the Tai Po Sea (now Tolo Harbour (Tolo Gang). For a short period in the 10th century AD Southern Han (during the turbulent Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period, the pearl farming became a tightly guarded Imperial monopoly. Thereafter the detail is uncertain but pearl fishing would seem to have continued, if not on a large scale, until the British annexation of the New Territories in 1898, although the centre of gravity, focussed on edible oysters, had moved to Deep Bay. An attempt was made to begin a cultivated pearl industry in Tolo Harbour in the 1960s but it failed. In this paper we seek to reconstruct the history of that episode and reveal the reasons why the ventures failed based on interviews with participants, newspaper clippings, government records and records kept by the Hong Kong Heritage Project. Despite government support, key failings were an inability to find the way to cultivate oysters in Hong Kong and a deficiency of wild pearl oysters available for grafting. Based on this historical lesson, the feasibility of revitalizing the pearl cultivation industry in highly urbanized coastal cities like Hong Kong, including improvements to water quality via biofiltration, are evaluated and discussed. Some recommendations are made for enabling the industry to be viable and sustainable. (C) 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www,journals.elsevier.com/regional-studies-in-marine-science-
dc.relation.ispartofRegional Studies in Marine Science-
dc.subjectPearl farming-
dc.subjectMariculture-
dc.subjectSustainable fisheries-
dc.subjectBiofiltration-
dc.titleProblems and prospects of revitalizing marine pearl cultivation in highly urbanized coasts: A case study of Tolo Harbour in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, KMY: kmyleung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailDavies, SNG: daiwaisi@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, KMY=rp00733-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.rsma.2019.100756-
dc.identifier.hkuros305566-
dc.identifier.volume31-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 100756-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 100756-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000485654700009-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-
dc.identifier.issnl2352-4855-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats