File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Efficacy of social story intervention in training toothbrushing skills among special-care children with and without autism

TitleEfficacy of social story intervention in training toothbrushing skills among special-care children with and without autism
Authors
Keywordsautism
training
social story
toothbrushing
pediatric
Issue Date2020
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1939-3806
Citation
Autism Research, 2020, v. 13 n. 4, p. 666-674 How to Cite?
AbstractToothbrushing is a routine practice for oral hygiene maintenance. It is also a challenging task for young children with special care needs. In this study, social stories were employed to teach toothbrushing skills for preschool children with special needs. Those children were recruited from the Special Child Care Centers, including 87 children with autism and 94 children without autism. A validated toothbrushing social story was used to demonstrate the toothbrushing procedure for all the recruited children. Parents were encouraged to show the stories to their children before or during their daily toothbrushing. Children's toothbrushing performance, oral hygiene status, and gingival health status were assessed at baseline and 6 months. Toothbrushing performance, oral hygiene, and gingival status of the recruited children were significantly improved after using social stories. Moreover, children with autism showed better oral hygiene status (P = 0.01) and better gingival status (P < 0.001) than their peers without autism. However, there were no significant differences in the toothbrushing performance among children with and without autism. The regression models indicated that the improvement of children's toothbrushing performance and oral health status were associated with children's intellectual functioning and parents' attitudes toward the usefulness of social story intervention. The principal findings suggested that social story intervention could be used to improve toothbrushing skills among children with or without autism, while it was more efficient in improving the oral hygiene status among children with autism. Autism Res 2019, 00: 1–9. © 2019 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/280348
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 5.216
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhou, N-
dc.contributor.authorWong, HM-
dc.contributor.authorMcGrath, C-
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-07T07:39:50Z-
dc.date.available2020-02-07T07:39:50Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationAutism Research, 2020, v. 13 n. 4, p. 666-674-
dc.identifier.issn1939-3792-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/280348-
dc.description.abstractToothbrushing is a routine practice for oral hygiene maintenance. It is also a challenging task for young children with special care needs. In this study, social stories were employed to teach toothbrushing skills for preschool children with special needs. Those children were recruited from the Special Child Care Centers, including 87 children with autism and 94 children without autism. A validated toothbrushing social story was used to demonstrate the toothbrushing procedure for all the recruited children. Parents were encouraged to show the stories to their children before or during their daily toothbrushing. Children's toothbrushing performance, oral hygiene status, and gingival health status were assessed at baseline and 6 months. Toothbrushing performance, oral hygiene, and gingival status of the recruited children were significantly improved after using social stories. Moreover, children with autism showed better oral hygiene status (P = 0.01) and better gingival status (P < 0.001) than their peers without autism. However, there were no significant differences in the toothbrushing performance among children with and without autism. The regression models indicated that the improvement of children's toothbrushing performance and oral health status were associated with children's intellectual functioning and parents' attitudes toward the usefulness of social story intervention. The principal findings suggested that social story intervention could be used to improve toothbrushing skills among children with or without autism, while it was more efficient in improving the oral hygiene status among children with autism. Autism Res 2019, 00: 1–9. © 2019 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1939-3806-
dc.relation.ispartofAutism Research-
dc.rightsPreprint This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. Postprint This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.subjectautism-
dc.subjecttraining-
dc.subjectsocial story-
dc.subjecttoothbrushing-
dc.subjectpediatric-
dc.titleEfficacy of social story intervention in training toothbrushing skills among special-care children with and without autism-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWong, HM: wonghmg@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailMcGrath, C: mcgrathc@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, HM=rp00042-
dc.identifier.authorityMcGrath, C=rp00037-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/aur.2256-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85076886769-
dc.identifier.hkuros309071-
dc.identifier.hkuros318342-
dc.identifier.volume13-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spage666-
dc.identifier.epage674-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000503863000001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.identifier.issnl1939-3806-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats