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Article: Pathogenesis and transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in golden hamsters

TitlePathogenesis and transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in golden hamsters
Authors
Issue Date2020
PublisherNature Research (part of Springer Nature). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/nature
Citation
Nature, 2020, v. 583 n. 7818, p. 834-838 How to Cite?
AbstractSevere acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), a novel coronavirus with high nucleotide identity to SARS-CoV and to SARS-related coronaviruses that have been detected in horseshoe bats, has spread across the world and had a global effect on healthcare systems and economies(1,2). A suitable small animal model is needed to support the development of vaccines and therapies. Here we report the pathogenesis and transmissibility of SARS-CoV-2 in golden (Syrian) hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). Immunohistochemistry assay demonstrated the presence of viral antigens in nasal mucosa, bronchial epithelial cells and areas of lung consolidation on days 2 and 5 after inoculation with SARS-CoV-2, followed by rapid viral clearance and pneumocyte hyperplasia at 7 days after inoculation. We also found viral antigens in epithelial cells of the duodenum, and detected viral RNA in faeces. Notably, SARS-CoV-2 was transmitted efficiently from inoculated hamsters to naive hamsters by direct contact and via aerosols. Transmission via fomites in soiled cages was not as efficient. Although viral RNA was continuously detected in the nasal washes of inoculated hamsters for 14 days, the communicable period was short and correlated with the detection of infectious virus but not viral RNA. Inoculated and naturally infected hamsters showed apparent weight loss on days 6-7 post-inoculation or post-contact; all hamsters returned to their original weight within 14 days and developed neutralizing antibodies. Our results suggest that features associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection in golden hamsters resemble those found in humans with mild SARS-CoV-2 infections.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/285256
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 49.962
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 21.936
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSia, SF-
dc.contributor.authorYan, LM-
dc.contributor.authorChin, WH-
dc.contributor.authorFung, K-
dc.contributor.authorChoy, KT-
dc.contributor.authorWong, AYL-
dc.contributor.authorKaewpreedee, P-
dc.contributor.authorPerera, RAPM-
dc.contributor.authorPoon, LLM-
dc.contributor.authorNicholls, JM-
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, M-
dc.contributor.authorYen, HL-
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-18T03:51:44Z-
dc.date.available2020-08-18T03:51:44Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationNature, 2020, v. 583 n. 7818, p. 834-838-
dc.identifier.issn0028-0836-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/285256-
dc.description.abstractSevere acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), a novel coronavirus with high nucleotide identity to SARS-CoV and to SARS-related coronaviruses that have been detected in horseshoe bats, has spread across the world and had a global effect on healthcare systems and economies(1,2). A suitable small animal model is needed to support the development of vaccines and therapies. Here we report the pathogenesis and transmissibility of SARS-CoV-2 in golden (Syrian) hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). Immunohistochemistry assay demonstrated the presence of viral antigens in nasal mucosa, bronchial epithelial cells and areas of lung consolidation on days 2 and 5 after inoculation with SARS-CoV-2, followed by rapid viral clearance and pneumocyte hyperplasia at 7 days after inoculation. We also found viral antigens in epithelial cells of the duodenum, and detected viral RNA in faeces. Notably, SARS-CoV-2 was transmitted efficiently from inoculated hamsters to naive hamsters by direct contact and via aerosols. Transmission via fomites in soiled cages was not as efficient. Although viral RNA was continuously detected in the nasal washes of inoculated hamsters for 14 days, the communicable period was short and correlated with the detection of infectious virus but not viral RNA. Inoculated and naturally infected hamsters showed apparent weight loss on days 6-7 post-inoculation or post-contact; all hamsters returned to their original weight within 14 days and developed neutralizing antibodies. Our results suggest that features associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection in golden hamsters resemble those found in humans with mild SARS-CoV-2 infections.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherNature Research (part of Springer Nature). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/nature-
dc.relation.ispartofNature-
dc.rightsThis is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in [insert journal title]. The final authenticated version is available online at: https://doi.org/[insert DOI]-
dc.titlePathogenesis and transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in golden hamsters-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailSia, SF: sfsia@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChin, WH: alexchin@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFung, K: kfung@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChoy, KT: ktchoy@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, AYL: awong18@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPerera, RAPM: mahenp@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPoon, LLM: llmpoon@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailNicholls, JM: jmnichol@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, M: malik@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYen, HL: hyen@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChin, WH=rp02345-
dc.identifier.authorityPerera, RAPM=rp02500-
dc.identifier.authorityPoon, LLM=rp00484-
dc.identifier.authorityNicholls, JM=rp00364-
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, M=rp00410-
dc.identifier.authorityYen, HL=rp00304-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41586-020-2342-5-
dc.identifier.pmid32408338-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC7394720-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85084651203-
dc.identifier.hkuros313034-
dc.identifier.volume583-
dc.identifier.issue7818-
dc.identifier.spage834-
dc.identifier.epage838-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000551400700001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.issnl0028-0836-

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