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Article: Meaning In Life As A Protective Factor Against Suicidal Tendencies In Chinese University Students

TitleMeaning In Life As A Protective Factor Against Suicidal Tendencies In Chinese University Students
Authors
KeywordsMeaning in life
Protective factor
FDI-24
Hopelessness
Suicide
China
Issue Date2020
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcpsychiatr/
Citation
BMC Psychiatry, 2020, v. 20, article no. 73 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: A substantial increase in rates of suicide worldwide, especially among late adolescents and young adults, has been observed. It is important to identify specific risk and protective factors for suicide-related behaviors among late adolescents and young adults. Identifying specific factors across the masses, not only in the Western, but also in the Asian context, helps researchers develop empirically informed intervention methods for the management of protective and risk factors of suicide. Methods: In the current study, 2074 students (706 males), filled out the Meaning in Life Questionnaire, with subscales of Search for Meaning (MLQ-S) and Presence of Meaning (MLQ-P); the Future Disposition Inventory-24 (FDI-24), with subscales of Positive Focus (PF), Suicide Orientation (SO), and Negative Focus (NF); and the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS). These scales measure protective and risk factors that are linked to suicidal behaviors; while suicidal behaviors were measured by the Suicidal Behaviors Questionnaire-Revised (SBQ-R). Mediation analyses were performed to test the models with both the MLQ-S and MLQ-P as the mediators between a) hopelessness, as measured by BHS and suicidal behaviors; and b) PF, SO, and NF, as measured by FDI-24, and suicidal behaviors. Results: We found that only MLQ-P mediated the relation between hopelessness and suicidal behaviors; while both MLQ-P and MLQ-S mediated PF, SO, and NF (as measured by FDI-24), and suicidal behaviors, respectively. Conclusion: Meaning in life, including both the presence of meaning in life and search for meaning, can be good protective factors against suicidal behaviors.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/287170
ISSN
2018 Impact Factor: 2.666
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.307
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLew, B-
dc.contributor.authorChistopolskaya, K-
dc.contributor.authorOsman, A-
dc.contributor.authorHuen, JMY-
dc.contributor.authorTalib, MA-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, ANM-
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-22T02:56:53Z-
dc.date.available2020-09-22T02:56:53Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationBMC Psychiatry, 2020, v. 20, article no. 73-
dc.identifier.issn1471-244X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/287170-
dc.description.abstractBackground: A substantial increase in rates of suicide worldwide, especially among late adolescents and young adults, has been observed. It is important to identify specific risk and protective factors for suicide-related behaviors among late adolescents and young adults. Identifying specific factors across the masses, not only in the Western, but also in the Asian context, helps researchers develop empirically informed intervention methods for the management of protective and risk factors of suicide. Methods: In the current study, 2074 students (706 males), filled out the Meaning in Life Questionnaire, with subscales of Search for Meaning (MLQ-S) and Presence of Meaning (MLQ-P); the Future Disposition Inventory-24 (FDI-24), with subscales of Positive Focus (PF), Suicide Orientation (SO), and Negative Focus (NF); and the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS). These scales measure protective and risk factors that are linked to suicidal behaviors; while suicidal behaviors were measured by the Suicidal Behaviors Questionnaire-Revised (SBQ-R). Mediation analyses were performed to test the models with both the MLQ-S and MLQ-P as the mediators between a) hopelessness, as measured by BHS and suicidal behaviors; and b) PF, SO, and NF, as measured by FDI-24, and suicidal behaviors. Results: We found that only MLQ-P mediated the relation between hopelessness and suicidal behaviors; while both MLQ-P and MLQ-S mediated PF, SO, and NF (as measured by FDI-24), and suicidal behaviors, respectively. Conclusion: Meaning in life, including both the presence of meaning in life and search for meaning, can be good protective factors against suicidal behaviors.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcpsychiatr/-
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Psychiatry-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectMeaning in life-
dc.subjectProtective factor-
dc.subjectFDI-24-
dc.subjectHopelessness-
dc.subjectSuicide-
dc.subjectChina-
dc.titleMeaning In Life As A Protective Factor Against Suicidal Tendencies In Chinese University Students-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12888-020-02485-4-
dc.identifier.pmid32070298-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC7027298-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85079594633-
dc.identifier.hkuros314353-
dc.identifier.volume20-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 73-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 73-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000517983600002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.issnl1471-244X-

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