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Article: Acupressure for labor pain management: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

TitleAcupressure for labor pain management: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
Authors
Keywordsacupressure
intrapartum
labor pain
meta-analysis
systematic review
Issue Date2020
PublisherSAGE Publications. The Journal's web site is located at http://v2.sherpa.ac.uk/id/publisher/65
Citation
Acupuncture in Medicine, 2020, Epub 2020-08-18 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To evaluate the efficacy/effectiveness of acupressure as an adjunct to standard procedures during labor and delivery, compared with standard procedures with/without sham acupressure, in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Methods: Ten main databases were searched from their inception until 31 January 2018. Two reviewers independently extracted data concerning the effects of acupressure on pain intensity, labor duration, mode of delivery, use of medications and adverse events. A meta-analysis of these measures was performed using RevMan 5.3. Pooled standardized mean differences (SMDs) or odds ratios (ORs) for the above outcomes were estimated with a fixed or random effects model, according to the heterogeneity. Results: A total of 13 RCTs including 1586 enrolled patients met the eligibility criteria. Acupressure plus standard procedures (ASP) for labor management significantly reduced pain sensation, compared with sham acupressure plus standard procedures (SASP) and standard procedures (SP) alone. The analgesic effect of acupressure was immediate and persisted for at least 60 min (all p < 0.01). Compared with the untreated control groups, the acupressure group had a shorter duration of labor, especially the first stage of labor (SMD = −0.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) = −1.10 to −0.43; p < 0.001; I2 = 74%) and second stage of labor (SMD = −0.37, 95% CI = −0.59 to −0.18; p < 0.001; I2 = 0%). Data suggesting that acupressure reduced the Cesarean section rate was inconclusive. The use of pharmacologic agents (oxytocin and analgesics) did not differ between the ASP, SASP and SP groups. No adverse events were reported in this limited number of studies. Conclusion: Moderate evidence indicates that acupressure may have promising effects on labor pain and duration. However, high-quality trials to verify these findings are warranted.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/287386
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.129
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.582

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, Y-
dc.contributor.authorXiang, XY-
dc.contributor.authorChin, KHR-
dc.contributor.authorGao, J-
dc.contributor.authorWu, J-
dc.contributor.authorLao, L-
dc.contributor.authorChen, H-
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-22T03:00:17Z-
dc.date.available2020-09-22T03:00:17Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationAcupuncture in Medicine, 2020, Epub 2020-08-18-
dc.identifier.issn0964-5284-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/287386-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To evaluate the efficacy/effectiveness of acupressure as an adjunct to standard procedures during labor and delivery, compared with standard procedures with/without sham acupressure, in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Methods: Ten main databases were searched from their inception until 31 January 2018. Two reviewers independently extracted data concerning the effects of acupressure on pain intensity, labor duration, mode of delivery, use of medications and adverse events. A meta-analysis of these measures was performed using RevMan 5.3. Pooled standardized mean differences (SMDs) or odds ratios (ORs) for the above outcomes were estimated with a fixed or random effects model, according to the heterogeneity. Results: A total of 13 RCTs including 1586 enrolled patients met the eligibility criteria. Acupressure plus standard procedures (ASP) for labor management significantly reduced pain sensation, compared with sham acupressure plus standard procedures (SASP) and standard procedures (SP) alone. The analgesic effect of acupressure was immediate and persisted for at least 60 min (all p < 0.01). Compared with the untreated control groups, the acupressure group had a shorter duration of labor, especially the first stage of labor (SMD = −0.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) = −1.10 to −0.43; p < 0.001; I2 = 74%) and second stage of labor (SMD = −0.37, 95% CI = −0.59 to −0.18; p < 0.001; I2 = 0%). Data suggesting that acupressure reduced the Cesarean section rate was inconclusive. The use of pharmacologic agents (oxytocin and analgesics) did not differ between the ASP, SASP and SP groups. No adverse events were reported in this limited number of studies. Conclusion: Moderate evidence indicates that acupressure may have promising effects on labor pain and duration. However, high-quality trials to verify these findings are warranted.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSAGE Publications. The Journal's web site is located at http://v2.sherpa.ac.uk/id/publisher/65-
dc.relation.ispartofAcupuncture in Medicine-
dc.rightsAcupuncture in Medicine. Copyright © SAGE Publications.-
dc.subjectacupressure-
dc.subjectintrapartum-
dc.subjectlabor pain-
dc.subjectmeta-analysis-
dc.subjectsystematic review-
dc.titleAcupressure for labor pain management: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWu, J: wujunmei@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLao, L: lxlao1@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChen, H: haiyong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWu, J=rp01948-
dc.identifier.authorityLao, L=rp01784-
dc.identifier.authorityChen, H=rp01923-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0964528420946044-
dc.identifier.pmid32811182-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85089578472-
dc.identifier.hkuros314523-
dc.identifier.volumeEpub 2020-08-18-
dc.identifier.spage096452842094604-
dc.identifier.epage096452842094604-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.issnl0964-5284-

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