File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Dietary patterns and cardiovascular disease in Australian adults: Findings from the 2011-12 Australian Health Survey

TitleDietary patterns and cardiovascular disease in Australian adults: Findings from the 2011-12 Australian Health Survey
Authors
KeywordsCardiovascular disease
Dietary pattern
Healthy diet
MIND diet
Paleolithic diet
Issue Date2020
PublisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/nmcd/
Citation
Nutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases, 2020, v. 30 n. 5, p. 738-748 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground and aims: Great discrepancies exist in results from studies examining the association between dietary patterns and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in different populations. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between the Australian Dietary Guidelines (ADG) 2013, Mediterranean-DASH diet Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay (MIND), Paleolithic and Okinawan dietary patterns and CVD respectively. Methods and results: In this cross-sectional secondary analysis of the 2011-12 Australian Health Survey, adults who self-reported physician-diagnosed CVD, completed two multiple-pass 24 h recalls and had no missing data on all confounders were analysed (weighted n = 5376; 295 CVD cases). Dietary intake was transformed to represent usual intake by the multiple source method. The score of Healthy Eating Index for Australian Adults (HEIFA-2013) was adopted for ADG 2013, while the scores of MIND, Paleolithic and Okinawan dietary patterns were constructed by separating the intake of each predefined food and nutrient into quintiles. The associations between the dietary patterns (as tertiles of scores) and CVD were examined using binary logistic regression adjusted for significant cardiovascular risk factors. Higher adherence to the Okinawan diet pattern was significantly associated with a reduced prevalence of ischemic heart disease (IHD) (OR per unit increase in dietary pattern score: 0.94, 95%CI: 0.90–0.98). Comparing its extreme tertiles, the OR was 0.49 (95%CI: 0.29–0.82; p trend < 0.01). The associations between HEIFA-2013, MIND and Paleolithic diet patterns and CVD were insignificant. Conclusion: The findings suggested an inverse association between adherence to Okinawan dietary pattern and prevalence of IHD in Australian adults.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/287746
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 4.222
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.558
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, MMH-
dc.contributor.authorGrech, A-
dc.contributor.authorLouie, JCY-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-05T12:02:39Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-05T12:02:39Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationNutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases, 2020, v. 30 n. 5, p. 738-748-
dc.identifier.issn0939-4753-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/287746-
dc.description.abstractBackground and aims: Great discrepancies exist in results from studies examining the association between dietary patterns and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in different populations. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between the Australian Dietary Guidelines (ADG) 2013, Mediterranean-DASH diet Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay (MIND), Paleolithic and Okinawan dietary patterns and CVD respectively. Methods and results: In this cross-sectional secondary analysis of the 2011-12 Australian Health Survey, adults who self-reported physician-diagnosed CVD, completed two multiple-pass 24 h recalls and had no missing data on all confounders were analysed (weighted n = 5376; 295 CVD cases). Dietary intake was transformed to represent usual intake by the multiple source method. The score of Healthy Eating Index for Australian Adults (HEIFA-2013) was adopted for ADG 2013, while the scores of MIND, Paleolithic and Okinawan dietary patterns were constructed by separating the intake of each predefined food and nutrient into quintiles. The associations between the dietary patterns (as tertiles of scores) and CVD were examined using binary logistic regression adjusted for significant cardiovascular risk factors. Higher adherence to the Okinawan diet pattern was significantly associated with a reduced prevalence of ischemic heart disease (IHD) (OR per unit increase in dietary pattern score: 0.94, 95%CI: 0.90–0.98). Comparing its extreme tertiles, the OR was 0.49 (95%CI: 0.29–0.82; p trend < 0.01). The associations between HEIFA-2013, MIND and Paleolithic diet patterns and CVD were insignificant. Conclusion: The findings suggested an inverse association between adherence to Okinawan dietary pattern and prevalence of IHD in Australian adults.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/nmcd/-
dc.relation.ispartofNutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases-
dc.subjectCardiovascular disease-
dc.subjectDietary pattern-
dc.subjectHealthy diet-
dc.subjectMIND diet-
dc.subjectPaleolithic diet-
dc.titleDietary patterns and cardiovascular disease in Australian adults: Findings from the 2011-12 Australian Health Survey-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLouie, JCY: jimmyl@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLouie, JCY=rp02118-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.numecd.2020.02.002-
dc.identifier.pmid32139253-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85080903543-
dc.identifier.hkuros314725-
dc.identifier.volume30-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage738-
dc.identifier.epage748-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000540699700003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.issnl0939-4753-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats