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Article: Current and emerging therapies for managing hyperphagia and obesity in Prader‐Willi syndrome: A narrative review

TitleCurrent and emerging therapies for managing hyperphagia and obesity in Prader‐Willi syndrome: A narrative review
Authors
Keywordshyperphagia
obesity
Prader‐Willi syndrome
therapy
Issue Date2020
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1467-789X
Citation
Obesity Reviews, 2020, v. 21 n. 5, p. article no. e12992 How to Cite?
AbstractIn early childhood, individuals with Prader‐Willi syndrome (PWS) experience excess weight gain and severe hyperphagia with food compulsivity, which often leads to early onset morbid obesity. Effective treatments for appetite suppression and weight control are currently unavailable for PWS. Our aim to further understand the pathogenesis of PWS led us to carry out a comprehensive search of the current and emerging therapies for managing hyperphagia and extreme weight gain in PWS. A literature search was performed using PubMed and the following keywords: “PWS” AND “therapy” OR “[drug name]”; reference lists, pharmaceutical websites, and the ClinicalTrials.gov registry were also reviewed. Articles presenting data from current standard treatments in PWS and also clinical trials of pharmacological agents in the pipeline were selected. Current standard treatments include dietary restriction/modifications, exercise, and growth hormone replacement, which appear to have limited efficacy for appetite and weight control in patients with PWS. The long‐term safety and effectiveness of bariatric surgery in PWS remains unknown. However, many promising pharmacotherapies are in development and, if approved, will bring much needed choices into the PWS pharmacological armamentarium. With the progress that is currently being made in our understanding of PWS, an effective treatment may not be far off.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289532
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 9.213
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.845
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTan, Q-
dc.contributor.authorOrsso, CE-
dc.contributor.authorDeehan, EC-
dc.contributor.authorTriador, L-
dc.contributor.authorField, CJ-
dc.contributor.authorTun, HM-
dc.contributor.authorHan, JC-
dc.contributor.authorMüller, TD-
dc.contributor.authorHaqq, AM-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-22T08:13:58Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-22T08:13:58Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationObesity Reviews, 2020, v. 21 n. 5, p. article no. e12992-
dc.identifier.issn1467-7881-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289532-
dc.description.abstractIn early childhood, individuals with Prader‐Willi syndrome (PWS) experience excess weight gain and severe hyperphagia with food compulsivity, which often leads to early onset morbid obesity. Effective treatments for appetite suppression and weight control are currently unavailable for PWS. Our aim to further understand the pathogenesis of PWS led us to carry out a comprehensive search of the current and emerging therapies for managing hyperphagia and extreme weight gain in PWS. A literature search was performed using PubMed and the following keywords: “PWS” AND “therapy” OR “[drug name]”; reference lists, pharmaceutical websites, and the ClinicalTrials.gov registry were also reviewed. Articles presenting data from current standard treatments in PWS and also clinical trials of pharmacological agents in the pipeline were selected. Current standard treatments include dietary restriction/modifications, exercise, and growth hormone replacement, which appear to have limited efficacy for appetite and weight control in patients with PWS. The long‐term safety and effectiveness of bariatric surgery in PWS remains unknown. However, many promising pharmacotherapies are in development and, if approved, will bring much needed choices into the PWS pharmacological armamentarium. With the progress that is currently being made in our understanding of PWS, an effective treatment may not be far off.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1467-789X-
dc.relation.ispartofObesity Reviews-
dc.rightsPreprint This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. Postprint This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.subjecthyperphagia-
dc.subjectobesity-
dc.subjectPrader‐Willi syndrome-
dc.subjecttherapy-
dc.titleCurrent and emerging therapies for managing hyperphagia and obesity in Prader‐Willi syndrome: A narrative review-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTun, HM: heinmtun@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTun, HM=rp02389-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/obr.12992-
dc.identifier.pmid31889409-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85077842745-
dc.identifier.hkuros316822-
dc.identifier.volume21-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. e12992-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. e12992-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000504848700001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.issnl1467-7881-

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