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Article: Vitamin D supplementation in pregnancy and early infancy in relation to gut microbiota composition and C. difficile colonization: implications for viral respiratory infections

TitleVitamin D supplementation in pregnancy and early infancy in relation to gut microbiota composition and C. difficile colonization: implications for viral respiratory infections
Authors
KeywordsVitamin D
supplements
milk
infant
gut microbiota
Issue Date2020
PublisherTaylor & Francis Inc. The Journal's web site is located at https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/kgmi20/current
Citation
Gut Microbes, 2020, v. 12 n. 1, p. article no. 1799734 How to Cite?
AbstractIn Canada and the US, the infant diet is supplemented with vitamin D via supplement drops or formula. Pregnant and nursing mothers often take vitamin D supplements. Since little is known about the impact of this supplementation on infant gut microbiota, we undertook a study to determine the association between maternal and infant vitamin D supplementation, infant gut microbiota composition and Clostridioides difficile colonization in 1,157 mother-infant pairs of the CHILD (Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development) Cohort Study over 2009–2012. Logistic and MaAsLin regression were employed to assess associations between vitamin D supplementation, and C. difficile colonization, or other gut microbiota, respectively. Sixty-five percent of infants received a vitamin D supplement. Among all infants, infant vitamin D supplementation was associated with a lower abundance of genus Megamonas (q = 0.01) in gut microbiota. Among those exclusively breastfed, maternal prenatal supplementation was associated with lower abundance of Bilophila (q = 0.01) and of Lachnospiraceae (q = 0.02) but higher abundance of Haemophilus (q = 0.02). There were no differences in microbiota composition with vitamin D supplementation among partially and not breastfed infants. Neither infant nor maternal vitamin D supplementation were associated with C. difficile colonization, after adjusting for breastfeeding status and other factors. However, maternal consumption of vitamin-D fortified milk reduced the likelihood of C. difficile colonization in infants (adjustedOR: 0.40, 95% CI: 0.19–0.82). The impact of this compositional difference on later childhood health, especially defense against viral respiratory infection, may go beyond the expected effects of vitamin D supplements and remains to be ascertained.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289534
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 10.245
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.294
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDrall, KM-
dc.contributor.authorField, CJ-
dc.contributor.authorHaqq, AM-
dc.contributor.authorde Souza, RJ-
dc.contributor.authorTun, HM-
dc.contributor.authorMorales-Lizcano,, NP-
dc.contributor.authorKonya, TB-
dc.contributor.authorGuttman, DS-
dc.contributor.authorAzad, MB-
dc.contributor.authorBecker, AB-
dc.contributor.authorLefebvre, DL-
dc.contributor.authorMandhane, PJ-
dc.contributor.authorMoraes, TJ-
dc.contributor.authorSears, MR-
dc.contributor.authorTurvey, SE-
dc.contributor.authorSubbarao, P-
dc.contributor.authorScott, JA-
dc.contributor.authorKozyrskyj, AL-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-22T08:13:59Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-22T08:13:59Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationGut Microbes, 2020, v. 12 n. 1, p. article no. 1799734-
dc.identifier.issn1949-0976-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289534-
dc.description.abstractIn Canada and the US, the infant diet is supplemented with vitamin D via supplement drops or formula. Pregnant and nursing mothers often take vitamin D supplements. Since little is known about the impact of this supplementation on infant gut microbiota, we undertook a study to determine the association between maternal and infant vitamin D supplementation, infant gut microbiota composition and Clostridioides difficile colonization in 1,157 mother-infant pairs of the CHILD (Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development) Cohort Study over 2009–2012. Logistic and MaAsLin regression were employed to assess associations between vitamin D supplementation, and C. difficile colonization, or other gut microbiota, respectively. Sixty-five percent of infants received a vitamin D supplement. Among all infants, infant vitamin D supplementation was associated with a lower abundance of genus Megamonas (q = 0.01) in gut microbiota. Among those exclusively breastfed, maternal prenatal supplementation was associated with lower abundance of Bilophila (q = 0.01) and of Lachnospiraceae (q = 0.02) but higher abundance of Haemophilus (q = 0.02). There were no differences in microbiota composition with vitamin D supplementation among partially and not breastfed infants. Neither infant nor maternal vitamin D supplementation were associated with C. difficile colonization, after adjusting for breastfeeding status and other factors. However, maternal consumption of vitamin-D fortified milk reduced the likelihood of C. difficile colonization in infants (adjustedOR: 0.40, 95% CI: 0.19–0.82). The impact of this compositional difference on later childhood health, especially defense against viral respiratory infection, may go beyond the expected effects of vitamin D supplements and remains to be ascertained.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Inc. The Journal's web site is located at https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/kgmi20/current-
dc.relation.ispartofGut Microbes-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectVitamin D-
dc.subjectsupplements-
dc.subjectmilk-
dc.subjectinfant-
dc.subjectgut microbiota-
dc.titleVitamin D supplementation in pregnancy and early infancy in relation to gut microbiota composition and C. difficile colonization: implications for viral respiratory infections-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTun, HM: heinmtun@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTun, HM=rp02389-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/19490976.2020.1799734-
dc.identifier.pmid32779963-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC7524344-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85089404801-
dc.identifier.hkuros316830-
dc.identifier.volume12-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 1799734-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 1799734-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000561526400001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.identifier.issnl1949-0976-

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