File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Anoxygenic photosynthesis and the delayed oxygenation of Earth’s atmosphere

TitleAnoxygenic photosynthesis and the delayed oxygenation of Earth’s atmosphere
Authors
Issue Date2019
PublisherNature Research: Fully open access journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ncomms/index.html
Citation
Nature Communications, 2019, v. 10 n. 1, p. article no. 3026 How to Cite?
AbstractThe emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis created a new niche with dramatic potential to transform energy flow through Earth’s biosphere. However, more primitive forms of photosynthesis that fix CO2 into biomass using electrons from reduced species like Fe(II) and H2 instead of water would have competed with Earth’s early oxygenic biosphere for essential nutrients. Here, we combine experimental microbiology, genomic analyses, and Earth system modeling to demonstrate that competition for light and nutrients in the surface ocean between oxygenic phototrophs and Fe(II)-oxidizing, anoxygenic photosynthesizers (photoferrotrophs) translates into diminished global photosynthetic O2 release when the ocean interior is Fe(II)-rich. These results provide a simple ecophysiological mechanism for inhibiting atmospheric oxygenation during Earth’s early history. We also find a novel positive feedback within the coupled C-P-O-Fe cycles that can lead to runaway planetary oxygenation as rising atmospheric pO2 sweeps the deep ocean of the ferrous iron substrate for photoferrotrophy.
Descriptioneid_2-s2.0-85068764861
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289670
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 14.919
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.559
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOzaki, K-
dc.contributor.authorThompson, KJ-
dc.contributor.authorSimister, RL-
dc.contributor.authorCrowe, SA-
dc.contributor.authorReinhard, CT-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-22T08:15:48Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-22T08:15:48Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationNature Communications, 2019, v. 10 n. 1, p. article no. 3026-
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289670-
dc.descriptioneid_2-s2.0-85068764861-
dc.description.abstractThe emergence of oxygenic photosynthesis created a new niche with dramatic potential to transform energy flow through Earth’s biosphere. However, more primitive forms of photosynthesis that fix CO2 into biomass using electrons from reduced species like Fe(II) and H2 instead of water would have competed with Earth’s early oxygenic biosphere for essential nutrients. Here, we combine experimental microbiology, genomic analyses, and Earth system modeling to demonstrate that competition for light and nutrients in the surface ocean between oxygenic phototrophs and Fe(II)-oxidizing, anoxygenic photosynthesizers (photoferrotrophs) translates into diminished global photosynthetic O2 release when the ocean interior is Fe(II)-rich. These results provide a simple ecophysiological mechanism for inhibiting atmospheric oxygenation during Earth’s early history. We also find a novel positive feedback within the coupled C-P-O-Fe cycles that can lead to runaway planetary oxygenation as rising atmospheric pO2 sweeps the deep ocean of the ferrous iron substrate for photoferrotrophy.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherNature Research: Fully open access journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ncomms/index.html-
dc.relation.ispartofNature Communications-
dc.rightsNature Communications. Copyright © Nature Research: Fully open access journals.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleAnoxygenic photosynthesis and the delayed oxygenation of Earth’s atmosphere-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailCrowe, SA: sacrowe@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityCrowe, SA=rp02537-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41467-019-10872-z-
dc.identifier.pmid31289261-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC6616575-
dc.identifier.hkuros316141-
dc.identifier.volume10-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 3026-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 3026-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000474506700012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.issnl2041-1723-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats