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Article: “Imitative” click chemistry to form a sticking xerogel for the portable therapy of bacteria-infected wounds

Title“Imitative” click chemistry to form a sticking xerogel for the portable therapy of bacteria-infected wounds
Authors
KeywordsAfter-treatment
Click chemistry
Cross-linking structures
Infected wounds
Staphylococcus aureus
Issue Date2019
PublisherRoyal Society of Chemistry. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.rsc.org/en/Journals/JournalIssues/bm#!recentarticles&all
Citation
Biomaterials Science, 2019, v. 7 n. 12, p. 5383-5387 How to Cite?
AbstractXerogels usually possess a stable structure and have a low swelling rate due to their inferior dynamics. Herein, a xerogel was synthesized by “imitative” click chemistry based on lipoic acid for picking up bacteria from wound sites, and thus accelerating tissue repair. The cross-linking structure of disulfide and thioether inside the xerogel not only exhibited good ductility and intrinsic self-healing performance, but also showed superior biocompatibility. The xerogel captured more than 60% of the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus via strong electrostatic adsorption in the colonies with a bacteria count of 106. In addition, this xerogel can stick to the skin in the form of patches in the wounds during therapy for wound healing and can be easily stripped from the skin after treatment, which makes it appropriate for the portable therapy of bacteria-infected wounds in emergency circumstances.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289809
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 6.183
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.347
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHUANG, B-
dc.contributor.authorLIU, X-
dc.contributor.authorTAN, L-
dc.contributor.authorCUI, Z-
dc.contributor.authorYANG, X-
dc.contributor.authorJING, D-
dc.contributor.authorZHENG, D-
dc.contributor.authorLI, Z-
dc.contributor.authorLIANG, Y-
dc.contributor.authorZHU, S-
dc.contributor.authorYeung, KWK-
dc.contributor.authorWANG, X-
dc.contributor.authorZHENG, Y-
dc.contributor.authorWU, S-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-22T08:17:47Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-22T08:17:47Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationBiomaterials Science, 2019, v. 7 n. 12, p. 5383-5387-
dc.identifier.issn2047-4830-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289809-
dc.description.abstractXerogels usually possess a stable structure and have a low swelling rate due to their inferior dynamics. Herein, a xerogel was synthesized by “imitative” click chemistry based on lipoic acid for picking up bacteria from wound sites, and thus accelerating tissue repair. The cross-linking structure of disulfide and thioether inside the xerogel not only exhibited good ductility and intrinsic self-healing performance, but also showed superior biocompatibility. The xerogel captured more than 60% of the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus via strong electrostatic adsorption in the colonies with a bacteria count of 106. In addition, this xerogel can stick to the skin in the form of patches in the wounds during therapy for wound healing and can be easily stripped from the skin after treatment, which makes it appropriate for the portable therapy of bacteria-infected wounds in emergency circumstances.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherRoyal Society of Chemistry. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.rsc.org/en/Journals/JournalIssues/bm#!recentarticles&all-
dc.relation.ispartofBiomaterials Science-
dc.subjectAfter-treatment-
dc.subjectClick chemistry-
dc.subjectCross-linking structures-
dc.subjectInfected wounds-
dc.subjectStaphylococcus aureus-
dc.title“Imitative” click chemistry to form a sticking xerogel for the portable therapy of bacteria-infected wounds-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailYeung, KWK: wkkyeung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYeung, KWK=rp00309-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1039/C9BM01417A-
dc.identifier.pmid31626246-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85075282021-
dc.identifier.hkuros317564-
dc.identifier.volume7-
dc.identifier.issue12-
dc.identifier.spage5383-
dc.identifier.epage5387-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000504250100039-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.issnl2047-4830-

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