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Article: Anhedonia in schizophrenia: Deficits in both motivation and hedonic capacity

TitleAnhedonia in schizophrenia: Deficits in both motivation and hedonic capacity
Authors
KeywordsAnhedonia
Motivation
Schizophrenia
Negative symptoms
Effort
Issue Date2015
Citation
Schizophrenia Research, 2015, v. 168, n. 1-2, p. 465-474 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Anhedonia is one of the core negative symptoms of schizophrenia that affect the ultimate outcome of this disorder. It is unclear whether the motivational or the hedonic component of anhedonia is impaired in patients with schizophrenia. This study examined the deficits in motivation and hedonic capacity in patients with schizophrenia using an Effort-based pleasure experience task (E-pet). Twenty-two schizophrenia patients with prominent negative symptoms, 18 schizophrenia patients without prominent negative symptoms and 29 healthy controls participated in the present study. All of them were administered the E-pet task, which required the participants to make decisions on whether to choose a hard or easy task based on probability and reward magnitude. When making the grip effort allocation decision, schizophrenia patients with prominent negative symptoms were significantly less likely to choose a hard task than healthy controls. As the reward magnitude and the estimated reward value increased, unlike healthy controls, schizophrenia patients with prominent negative symptoms did not increase their hard task choices. They were also significantly less likely to choose a hard task than healthy controls in medium and high probability conditions. When anticipating potential rewards, these patients reported significantly less anticipatory pleasure than healthy controls, even when reward probability and magnitude increased. The pleasure experience rating after obtaining the actual reward was positively correlated with two pleasure experience scales in schizophrenia patients. In conclusion, patients with schizophrenia, especially those with prominent negative symptoms, showed deficits in both reward motivation and anticipatory pleasure experience.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/292904
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 4.939
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.923
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, Jiao-
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Jia-
dc.contributor.authorYang, Xin hua-
dc.contributor.authorLui, Simon S.Y.-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Eric F.C.-
dc.contributor.authorChan, Raymond C.K.-
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-17T14:57:27Z-
dc.date.available2020-11-17T14:57:27Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationSchizophrenia Research, 2015, v. 168, n. 1-2, p. 465-474-
dc.identifier.issn0920-9964-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/292904-
dc.description.abstract© 2015 Elsevier B.V. Anhedonia is one of the core negative symptoms of schizophrenia that affect the ultimate outcome of this disorder. It is unclear whether the motivational or the hedonic component of anhedonia is impaired in patients with schizophrenia. This study examined the deficits in motivation and hedonic capacity in patients with schizophrenia using an Effort-based pleasure experience task (E-pet). Twenty-two schizophrenia patients with prominent negative symptoms, 18 schizophrenia patients without prominent negative symptoms and 29 healthy controls participated in the present study. All of them were administered the E-pet task, which required the participants to make decisions on whether to choose a hard or easy task based on probability and reward magnitude. When making the grip effort allocation decision, schizophrenia patients with prominent negative symptoms were significantly less likely to choose a hard task than healthy controls. As the reward magnitude and the estimated reward value increased, unlike healthy controls, schizophrenia patients with prominent negative symptoms did not increase their hard task choices. They were also significantly less likely to choose a hard task than healthy controls in medium and high probability conditions. When anticipating potential rewards, these patients reported significantly less anticipatory pleasure than healthy controls, even when reward probability and magnitude increased. The pleasure experience rating after obtaining the actual reward was positively correlated with two pleasure experience scales in schizophrenia patients. In conclusion, patients with schizophrenia, especially those with prominent negative symptoms, showed deficits in both reward motivation and anticipatory pleasure experience.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofSchizophrenia Research-
dc.subjectAnhedonia-
dc.subjectMotivation-
dc.subjectSchizophrenia-
dc.subjectNegative symptoms-
dc.subjectEffort-
dc.titleAnhedonia in schizophrenia: Deficits in both motivation and hedonic capacity-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.schres.2015.06.019-
dc.identifier.pmid26185892-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84942367690-
dc.identifier.hkuros319516-
dc.identifier.volume168-
dc.identifier.issue1-2-
dc.identifier.spage465-
dc.identifier.epage474-
dc.identifier.eissn1573-2509-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000361826400067-
dc.identifier.issnl0920-9964-

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