File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Lung injury induced by short-term mechanical ventilation with hyperoxia and its mitigation by deferoxamine in rats

TitleLung injury induced by short-term mechanical ventilation with hyperoxia and its mitigation by deferoxamine in rats
Authors
KeywordsHyperoxia acute lung injury
Mechanical ventilation
Deferoxamine
Lung surfactant protein
Xanthine oxidase
Issue Date2020
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcanesthesiol/
Citation
BMC Anesthesiology, 2020, v. 20, p. article no. 188 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Long-term mechanical ventilation with hyperoxia can induce lung injury. General anesthesia is associated with a very high incidence of hyperoxaemia, despite it usually lasts for a relatively short period of time. It remains unclear whether short-term mechanical ventilation with hyperoxia has an adverse impact on or cause injury to the lungs. The present study aimed to assess whether short-term mechanical ventilation with hyperoxia may cause lung injury in rats and whether deferoxamine (DFO), a ferrous ion chelator, could mitigate such injury to the lungs and explore the possible mechanism. Methods: Twenty-four SD rats were randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 8/group): mechanical ventilated with normoxia group (MV group, FiO2 = 21%), with hyperoxia group (HMV group, FiO2 = 90%), or with hyperoxia + DFO group (HMV + DFO group, FiO2 = 90%). Mechanical ventilation under different oxygen concentrations was given for 4 h, and ECG was monitored. The HMV + DFO group received continuous intravenous infusion of DFO at 50 mg•kg− 1•h− 1, while the MV and HMV groups received an equal volume of normal saline. Carotid artery cannulation was carried out to monitor the blood gas parameters under mechanical ventilation for 2 and 4 h, respectively, and the PaO2/FiO2 ratio was calculated. After 4 h ventilation, the right anterior lobe of the lung and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from the right lung was sampled for pathological and biochemical assays. Results: PaO2 in the HMV and HMV + DFO groups were significantly higher, but the PaO2/FiO2 ratio were significantly lower than those of the MV group (all p < 0.01), while PaO2 and PaO2/FiO2 ratio between HMV + DFO and HMV groups did not differ significantly. The lung pathological scores and the wet-to-dry weight ratio (W/D) in the HMV and HMV + DFO groups were significantly higher than those of the MV group, but the lung pathological score and the W/D ratio were reduced by DFO (p < 0.05, HMV + DFO vs. HMV). Biochemically, HMV resulted in significant reductions in Surfactant protein C (SP-C), Surfactant protein D (SP-D), and Glutathion reductase (GR) levels and elevation of xanthine oxidase (XOD) in both the Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and the lung tissue homogenate, and all these changes were prevented or significantly reverted by DFO. Conclusions: Mechanical ventilation with hyperoxia for 4 h induced oxidative injury of the lungs, accompanied by a dramatic reduction in the concentrations of SP-C and SP-D. DFO could mitigate such injury by lowering XOD activity and elevating GR activity.
Descriptioneid_2-s2.0-85088908127
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/293251
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 2.217
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.655
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, XX-
dc.contributor.authorSha, XL-
dc.contributor.authorLi, YL-
dc.contributor.authorLi, CL-
dc.contributor.authorChan, SH-
dc.contributor.authorWang, JJ-
dc.contributor.authorXia, Z-
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-23T08:14:02Z-
dc.date.available2020-11-23T08:14:02Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationBMC Anesthesiology, 2020, v. 20, p. article no. 188-
dc.identifier.issn1471-2253-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/293251-
dc.descriptioneid_2-s2.0-85088908127-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Long-term mechanical ventilation with hyperoxia can induce lung injury. General anesthesia is associated with a very high incidence of hyperoxaemia, despite it usually lasts for a relatively short period of time. It remains unclear whether short-term mechanical ventilation with hyperoxia has an adverse impact on or cause injury to the lungs. The present study aimed to assess whether short-term mechanical ventilation with hyperoxia may cause lung injury in rats and whether deferoxamine (DFO), a ferrous ion chelator, could mitigate such injury to the lungs and explore the possible mechanism. Methods: Twenty-four SD rats were randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 8/group): mechanical ventilated with normoxia group (MV group, FiO2 = 21%), with hyperoxia group (HMV group, FiO2 = 90%), or with hyperoxia + DFO group (HMV + DFO group, FiO2 = 90%). Mechanical ventilation under different oxygen concentrations was given for 4 h, and ECG was monitored. The HMV + DFO group received continuous intravenous infusion of DFO at 50 mg•kg− 1•h− 1, while the MV and HMV groups received an equal volume of normal saline. Carotid artery cannulation was carried out to monitor the blood gas parameters under mechanical ventilation for 2 and 4 h, respectively, and the PaO2/FiO2 ratio was calculated. After 4 h ventilation, the right anterior lobe of the lung and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from the right lung was sampled for pathological and biochemical assays. Results: PaO2 in the HMV and HMV + DFO groups were significantly higher, but the PaO2/FiO2 ratio were significantly lower than those of the MV group (all p < 0.01), while PaO2 and PaO2/FiO2 ratio between HMV + DFO and HMV groups did not differ significantly. The lung pathological scores and the wet-to-dry weight ratio (W/D) in the HMV and HMV + DFO groups were significantly higher than those of the MV group, but the lung pathological score and the W/D ratio were reduced by DFO (p < 0.05, HMV + DFO vs. HMV). Biochemically, HMV resulted in significant reductions in Surfactant protein C (SP-C), Surfactant protein D (SP-D), and Glutathion reductase (GR) levels and elevation of xanthine oxidase (XOD) in both the Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and the lung tissue homogenate, and all these changes were prevented or significantly reverted by DFO. Conclusions: Mechanical ventilation with hyperoxia for 4 h induced oxidative injury of the lungs, accompanied by a dramatic reduction in the concentrations of SP-C and SP-D. DFO could mitigate such injury by lowering XOD activity and elevating GR activity.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcanesthesiol/-
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Anesthesiology-
dc.rightsBMC Anesthesiology. Copyright © BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectHyperoxia acute lung injury-
dc.subjectMechanical ventilation-
dc.subjectDeferoxamine-
dc.subjectLung surfactant protein-
dc.subjectXanthine oxidase-
dc.titleLung injury induced by short-term mechanical ventilation with hyperoxia and its mitigation by deferoxamine in rats-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailXia, Z: zyxia@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityXia, Z=rp00532-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12871-020-01089-5-
dc.identifier.pmid32738874-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC7395352-
dc.identifier.hkuros319751-
dc.identifier.volume20-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 188-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 188-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000559748100004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.issnl1471-2253-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats