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Article: Common childhood viruses and pubertal timing: the LEGACY girls study

TitleCommon childhood viruses and pubertal timing: the LEGACY girls study
Authors
KeywordsBreast development
Menarche
Puberty
Pubic hair
Viral infection
Issue Date2021
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
American Journal of Epidemiology, 2021, v. 190 n. 5, p. 766-778 How to Cite?
AbstractEarlier pubertal development is only partially explained by childhood body mass index; the role of other factors, such as childhood infections, is less understood. Using data from the LEGACY Girls Study (North America, 2011–2016), we prospectively examined the associations between childhood viral infections (cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1, HSV2) and pubertal timing. We measured exposures based on seropositivity in premenarcheal girls (n = 490). Breast and pubic hair development were classified based on mother-reported Tanner Stage (TS) (TS2+ compared with TS1), adjusting for age, body mass index, and sociodemographic factors. The average age at first blood draw was 9.8 years (standard deviation, 1.9 years). The prevalences were 31% CMV+, 37% EBV+, 14% HSV1+, 0.4% HSV2+, and 16% for both CMV+/EBV+ coinfection. CMV+ infection without coinfection was associated with developing breasts an average of 7 months earlier (hazard ratio (HR) = 2.12, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.32, 3.40). CMV infection without coinfection and HSV1 and/or HSV2 infection were associated with developing pubic hair 9 months later (HR = 0.41, 95% CI: 0.24, 0.71, and HR = 0.42, 95% CI: 0.22, 0.81, respectively). Infection was not associated with menarche. If replicated in larger cohorts with blood collection prior to any breast development, this study supports the hypothesis that childhood infections might play a role in altering pubertal timing.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/293480
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 4.897
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.330
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, JA-
dc.contributor.authorCherubin, S-
dc.contributor.authorGoldberg, M-
dc.contributor.authorWei, Y-
dc.contributor.authorChung, WK-
dc.contributor.authorSchwartz, LA-
dc.contributor.authorKnight, JA-
dc.contributor.authorSchooling, CM-
dc.contributor.authorSantella, RM-
dc.contributor.authorBradbury, AR-
dc.contributor.authorBuys, SS-
dc.contributor.authorAndrulis, IL-
dc.contributor.authorJohn, EM-
dc.contributor.authorDaly, MB-
dc.contributor.authorTerry, MB-
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-23T08:17:23Z-
dc.date.available2020-11-23T08:17:23Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal of Epidemiology, 2021, v. 190 n. 5, p. 766-778-
dc.identifier.issn0002-9262-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/293480-
dc.description.abstractEarlier pubertal development is only partially explained by childhood body mass index; the role of other factors, such as childhood infections, is less understood. Using data from the LEGACY Girls Study (North America, 2011–2016), we prospectively examined the associations between childhood viral infections (cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1, HSV2) and pubertal timing. We measured exposures based on seropositivity in premenarcheal girls (n = 490). Breast and pubic hair development were classified based on mother-reported Tanner Stage (TS) (TS2+ compared with TS1), adjusting for age, body mass index, and sociodemographic factors. The average age at first blood draw was 9.8 years (standard deviation, 1.9 years). The prevalences were 31% CMV+, 37% EBV+, 14% HSV1+, 0.4% HSV2+, and 16% for both CMV+/EBV+ coinfection. CMV+ infection without coinfection was associated with developing breasts an average of 7 months earlier (hazard ratio (HR) = 2.12, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.32, 3.40). CMV infection without coinfection and HSV1 and/or HSV2 infection were associated with developing pubic hair 9 months later (HR = 0.41, 95% CI: 0.24, 0.71, and HR = 0.42, 95% CI: 0.22, 0.81, respectively). Infection was not associated with menarche. If replicated in larger cohorts with blood collection prior to any breast development, this study supports the hypothesis that childhood infections might play a role in altering pubertal timing.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Epidemiology-
dc.subjectBreast development-
dc.subjectMenarche-
dc.subjectPuberty-
dc.subjectPubic hair-
dc.subjectViral infection-
dc.titleCommon childhood viruses and pubertal timing: the LEGACY girls study-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailSchooling, CM: cms1@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authoritySchooling, CM=rp00504-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/aje/kwaa240-
dc.identifier.pmid33128063-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC8096486-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85103949689-
dc.identifier.hkuros319977-
dc.identifier.volume190-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage766-
dc.identifier.epage778-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000667749900010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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