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Article: Prevalence of mild behavioural impairment: a systematic review and meta‐analysis

TitlePrevalence of mild behavioural impairment: a systematic review and meta‐analysis
Authors
Keywordsmeta&#8208
analysis
mild behavioural impairment
mild cognitive impairment
prevalence
Issue Date2021
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/14798301
Citation
Psychogeriatrics, 2021, v. 21, p. 100-111 How to Cite?
AbstractAim: Mild behavioural impairment (MBI) is a neurobehavioural syndrome characterized by emergent neuropsychiatric symptoms in later life. There has been no systematic review or meta-analysis on the prevalence of MBI. The main aim of the study is to calculate the pooled prevalence of MBI. Methods: A search of the literature on MBI in mild cognitive impairment (MCI), cognitively normal (CN), and subjective cognitive impairment (SCI) and CN but at risk (CN-AR) subjects published between 1 January 2003 and 28 September 2020 was conducted. Meta-analysis using a random effects model was performed to determine the pooled estimate of the prevalence of MBI. Meta-regression was performed to identify factors contributing to the variance of prevalence rate. A systematic review was also performed to study the impact of MBI in cognitive outcomes and its correlation to the pathology and genetics of Alzheimer's disease. Results: Eleven studies conducted among 15 689 subjects underwent meta-analysis, revealing the pooled prevalence of MBI to be 33.5% (95% confidence interval (CI): 22.6%-46.6%). Seven studies conducted among 1358 MCI subjects underwent meta-analysis, revealing the pooled prevalence to be 45.5% (95%CI: 36.1%-55.3%). Four studies conducted among 13 153 CN subjects underwent meta-analysis, revealing the pooled prevalence to be 17.0% (95%CI: 7.2%-34.9%). Five studies conducted among 1158 SCI or CN-AR subjects underwent meta-analysis, revealing the pooled prevalence to be 35.8% (95%CI: 21.4%-53.2%). A systematic review of 13 studies showed that MBI has a significant impact on cognitive deterioration and is associated with the pathology and genetics of Alzheimer's disease. Conclusions: In MCI, CN, and SCI and CN-AR subjects, MBI is common. Our finding is potentially useful in planning future clinical trials.
DescriptionBronze open access
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/295837
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 2.44
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.647
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPan, Y-
dc.contributor.authorShea, YF-
dc.contributor.authorLI, S-
dc.contributor.authorCHEN, R-
dc.contributor.authorMak, HKF-
dc.contributor.authorChiu, PKC-
dc.contributor.authorChu, LW-
dc.contributor.authorSong, YQ-
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-08T08:14:43Z-
dc.date.available2021-02-08T08:14:43Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationPsychogeriatrics, 2021, v. 21, p. 100-111-
dc.identifier.issn1346-3500-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/295837-
dc.descriptionBronze open access-
dc.description.abstractAim: Mild behavioural impairment (MBI) is a neurobehavioural syndrome characterized by emergent neuropsychiatric symptoms in later life. There has been no systematic review or meta-analysis on the prevalence of MBI. The main aim of the study is to calculate the pooled prevalence of MBI. Methods: A search of the literature on MBI in mild cognitive impairment (MCI), cognitively normal (CN), and subjective cognitive impairment (SCI) and CN but at risk (CN-AR) subjects published between 1 January 2003 and 28 September 2020 was conducted. Meta-analysis using a random effects model was performed to determine the pooled estimate of the prevalence of MBI. Meta-regression was performed to identify factors contributing to the variance of prevalence rate. A systematic review was also performed to study the impact of MBI in cognitive outcomes and its correlation to the pathology and genetics of Alzheimer's disease. Results: Eleven studies conducted among 15 689 subjects underwent meta-analysis, revealing the pooled prevalence of MBI to be 33.5% (95% confidence interval (CI): 22.6%-46.6%). Seven studies conducted among 1358 MCI subjects underwent meta-analysis, revealing the pooled prevalence to be 45.5% (95%CI: 36.1%-55.3%). Four studies conducted among 13 153 CN subjects underwent meta-analysis, revealing the pooled prevalence to be 17.0% (95%CI: 7.2%-34.9%). Five studies conducted among 1158 SCI or CN-AR subjects underwent meta-analysis, revealing the pooled prevalence to be 35.8% (95%CI: 21.4%-53.2%). A systematic review of 13 studies showed that MBI has a significant impact on cognitive deterioration and is associated with the pathology and genetics of Alzheimer's disease. Conclusions: In MCI, CN, and SCI and CN-AR subjects, MBI is common. Our finding is potentially useful in planning future clinical trials.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/14798301-
dc.relation.ispartofPsychogeriatrics-
dc.rightsSubmitted (preprint) Version This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. Accepted (peer-reviewed) Version This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.subjectmeta&#8208-
dc.subjectanalysis-
dc.subjectmild behavioural impairment-
dc.subjectmild cognitive impairment-
dc.subjectprevalence-
dc.titlePrevalence of mild behavioural impairment: a systematic review and meta‐analysis-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailPan, Y: pyn8306@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailShea, YF: yfshea@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailMak, HKF: makkf@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChiu, PKC: chiukc@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChu, LW: lwchu@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSong, YQ: songy@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityMak, HKF=rp00533-
dc.identifier.authoritySong, YQ=rp00488-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/psyg.12636-
dc.identifier.pmid33260271-
dc.identifier.hkuros321219-
dc.identifier.volume21-
dc.identifier.spage100-
dc.identifier.epage111-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000594527000001-
dc.publisher.placeAustralia-

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