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Article: Object-based detailed vegetation classification with airborne high spatial resolution remote sensing imagery

TitleObject-based detailed vegetation classification with airborne high spatial resolution remote sensing imagery
Authors
Issue Date2006
Citation
Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing, 2006, v. 72, n. 7, p. 799-811 How to Cite?
AbstractIn this paper, we evaluate the capability of the high spatial resolution airborne Digital Airborne Imaging System (DAIS) imagery for detailed vegetation classification at the alliance level with the aid of ancillary topographic data. Image objects as minimum classification units were generated through the Fractal Net Evolution Approach (FNEA) segmentation using eCognition software. For each object, 52 features were calculated including spectral features, textures, topographic features, and geometric features. After statistically ranking the importance of these features with the classification and regression tree algorithm (CART), the most effective features for classification were used to classify the vegetation. Due to the uneven sample size for each class, we chose a non-parametric (nearest neighbor) classifier. We built a hierarchical classification scheme and selected features for each of the broadest categories to carry out the detailed classification, which significantly improved the accuracy. Pixel-based maximum likelihood classification (MLC) with comparable features was used as a benchmark in evaluating our approach. The object-based classification approach overcame the problem of salt-and-pepper effects found in classification results from traditional pixel-based approaches. The method takes advantage of the rich amount of local spatial information present in the irregularly shaped objects in an image. This classification approach was successfully tested at Point Reyes National Seashore in Northern California to create a comprehensive vegetation inventory. Computer-assisted classification of high spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery has good potential to substitute or augment the present ground-based inventory of National Park lands. © 2006 American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/296592
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 1.083
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.483
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYu, Qian-
dc.contributor.authorGong, Peng-
dc.contributor.authorClinton, Nick-
dc.contributor.authorBiging, Greg-
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Maggi-
dc.contributor.authorSchirokauer, Dave-
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-25T15:16:13Z-
dc.date.available2021-02-25T15:16:13Z-
dc.date.issued2006-
dc.identifier.citationPhotogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing, 2006, v. 72, n. 7, p. 799-811-
dc.identifier.issn0099-1112-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/296592-
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, we evaluate the capability of the high spatial resolution airborne Digital Airborne Imaging System (DAIS) imagery for detailed vegetation classification at the alliance level with the aid of ancillary topographic data. Image objects as minimum classification units were generated through the Fractal Net Evolution Approach (FNEA) segmentation using eCognition software. For each object, 52 features were calculated including spectral features, textures, topographic features, and geometric features. After statistically ranking the importance of these features with the classification and regression tree algorithm (CART), the most effective features for classification were used to classify the vegetation. Due to the uneven sample size for each class, we chose a non-parametric (nearest neighbor) classifier. We built a hierarchical classification scheme and selected features for each of the broadest categories to carry out the detailed classification, which significantly improved the accuracy. Pixel-based maximum likelihood classification (MLC) with comparable features was used as a benchmark in evaluating our approach. The object-based classification approach overcame the problem of salt-and-pepper effects found in classification results from traditional pixel-based approaches. The method takes advantage of the rich amount of local spatial information present in the irregularly shaped objects in an image. This classification approach was successfully tested at Point Reyes National Seashore in Northern California to create a comprehensive vegetation inventory. Computer-assisted classification of high spatial resolution remotely sensed imagery has good potential to substitute or augment the present ground-based inventory of National Park lands. © 2006 American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofPhotogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing-
dc.titleObject-based detailed vegetation classification with airborne high spatial resolution remote sensing imagery-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.14358/PERS.72.7.799-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33745615125-
dc.identifier.volume72-
dc.identifier.issue7-
dc.identifier.spage799-
dc.identifier.epage811-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000238704400010-
dc.identifier.issnl0099-1112-

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