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Article: Evaluation of the introduction of a dental virtual simulator on the performance of undergraduate dental students in the pre‐clinical operative dentistry course

TitleEvaluation of the introduction of a dental virtual simulator on the performance of undergraduate dental students in the pre‐clinical operative dentistry course
Authors
Keywordsdental students
dental virtual simulators
performance of undergraduate
pre-clinical
virtual reality
Issue Date2020
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1600-0579
Citation
European Journal of Dental Education, 2020, v. 24 n. 1, p. 5-16 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction Virtual reality-based platforms are becoming increasingly popular in education. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of undergraduate dental students with the introduction of the Moog Simodont dental trainer (VR) within the pre-clinical curriculum in the direct restoration module of the operative dentistry course using manual and digital methods. Methods Thirty-two randomly selected year 2 undergraduate students were divided into two groups: group 1, exposed to the Moog Simodont dental trainer (VR) and group 2, no exposure to VR. All students were then evaluated in carrying out a Class I preparation in a single-blinded fashion. All preparations were evaluated by three assessors using a traditional manual approach and a digital software. Statistical analysis of the data was performed using chi-square test (alpha = 0.05). Results The number of students who performed satisfactory preparations was more in group 1 (12/16), compared to group 2 (7/16). The percentage of satisfactory domains was significantly higher in group 1, compared to group 2, both in the manual evaluation (83.9% (94/112) and 59.8% (67/112) in groups 1 and 2, respectively) and in the digital evaluation (85.7% (96/112) and 55.4% (62/112) in groups 1 and 2, respectively) (P < .05). There was no significant difference between the manual and digital methods of evaluation with regard to the percentage of satisfactory or unsatisfactory preparations (P > .05). Conclusions The use of the Moog Simodont dental trainer (VR) significantly improved the satisfactory performance of students. The virtual reality simulator may be a valuable adjunct in the undergraduate direct restorations course and for remedial student.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/297676
ISSN
2022 Impact Factor: 2.4
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.583
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMurbay, S-
dc.contributor.authorChang, JWW-
dc.contributor.authorYeung, S-
dc.contributor.authorNeelakantan, P-
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-23T04:20:11Z-
dc.date.available2021-03-23T04:20:11Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal of Dental Education, 2020, v. 24 n. 1, p. 5-16-
dc.identifier.issn1396-5883-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/297676-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction Virtual reality-based platforms are becoming increasingly popular in education. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of undergraduate dental students with the introduction of the Moog Simodont dental trainer (VR) within the pre-clinical curriculum in the direct restoration module of the operative dentistry course using manual and digital methods. Methods Thirty-two randomly selected year 2 undergraduate students were divided into two groups: group 1, exposed to the Moog Simodont dental trainer (VR) and group 2, no exposure to VR. All students were then evaluated in carrying out a Class I preparation in a single-blinded fashion. All preparations were evaluated by three assessors using a traditional manual approach and a digital software. Statistical analysis of the data was performed using chi-square test (alpha = 0.05). Results The number of students who performed satisfactory preparations was more in group 1 (12/16), compared to group 2 (7/16). The percentage of satisfactory domains was significantly higher in group 1, compared to group 2, both in the manual evaluation (83.9% (94/112) and 59.8% (67/112) in groups 1 and 2, respectively) and in the digital evaluation (85.7% (96/112) and 55.4% (62/112) in groups 1 and 2, respectively) (P < .05). There was no significant difference between the manual and digital methods of evaluation with regard to the percentage of satisfactory or unsatisfactory preparations (P > .05). Conclusions The use of the Moog Simodont dental trainer (VR) significantly improved the satisfactory performance of students. The virtual reality simulator may be a valuable adjunct in the undergraduate direct restorations course and for remedial student.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1600-0579-
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Dental Education-
dc.rightsSubmitted (preprint) Version This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. Accepted (peer-reviewed) Version This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.subjectdental students-
dc.subjectdental virtual simulators-
dc.subjectperformance of undergraduate-
dc.subjectpre-clinical-
dc.subjectvirtual reality-
dc.titleEvaluation of the introduction of a dental virtual simulator on the performance of undergraduate dental students in the pre‐clinical operative dentistry course-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChang, JWW: jwwchang@connect.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYeung, S: skwyeung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailNeelakantan, P: prasanna@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChang, JWW=rp00046-
dc.identifier.authorityNeelakantan, P=rp02214-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/eje.12453-
dc.identifier.pmid31278815-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85077838080-
dc.identifier.hkuros321920-
dc.identifier.volume24-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage5-
dc.identifier.epage16-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000507338100001-
dc.publisher.placeDenmark-

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