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Article: Knowledge and practice of home blood pressure monitoring 6 months after the risk and assessment management programme: does health literacy matter?

TitleKnowledge and practice of home blood pressure monitoring 6 months after the risk and assessment management programme: does health literacy matter?
Authors
Issue Date2021
Citation
Postgraduate Medical Journal, 2021, p. postgradmedj-2020-139329 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground Little is known whether patients with lower health literacy could retain the practice and knowledge of home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) after an educational programme. Methods A cluster randomised controlled trial in five primary care clinics recruited participants with uncontrolled hypertension. Clinics were randomised either to a HBPM group education (Risk Assessment and Management Programme (RAMP-group), or individual counselling of self-management (RAMP-individual). Health literacy was assessed by the Chinese Health Literacy Scale for Chronic Care. Practice and knowledge of HBPM were surveyed by a 10-item HBPM knowledge checklist and patient record review 6 months after interventions. Predictors for regular HBPM and good HBPM knowledge were assessed by multivariate logistic regression models. Results 287 participants (RAMP-group: 151; RAMP-individual: 136) were follow-up for 6 months. 272 participants completed the knowledge questionnaires (response rate 94.8%). 67.8% of the participants performed HBPM regularly, and there was no statistical difference between both interventions. Age more than 65 (adjusted odds ratios (aOR) 2.58, 95% CI 1.37 to 4.86, p=0.003), not working (aOR 2.34, 95% CI 1.10 to 4.97, p=0.027)and adequate health literacy (aOR 2.25, 95% CI 1.28 to 3.95, p=0.005) predicted regular HBPM. Participants in RAMP-group demonstrated a significant lower body weight than those in RAMP-individual (−0.3±2.0 kg vs +0.7 ±1.7 kg, p<0.001).The RAMP-group participants were eight times more likely to have full HBPM knowledge score than the RAMP-individual participants (aOR 8.46, 95% CI 4.68 to 15.28, p<0.001). Conclusion Patients could retain HBPM knowledge better after RAMP-group than RAMP-individual. Older, retired and patients with adequate health literacy were more likely to continue weekly HBPM 6 months after education. Trial registration number NCT02551393.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/300311

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorFU, SN-
dc.contributor.authorDao, MC-
dc.contributor.authorWong, CKH-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BMY-
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-04T08:41:08Z-
dc.date.available2021-06-04T08:41:08Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationPostgraduate Medical Journal, 2021, p. postgradmedj-2020-139329-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/300311-
dc.description.abstractBackground Little is known whether patients with lower health literacy could retain the practice and knowledge of home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM) after an educational programme. Methods A cluster randomised controlled trial in five primary care clinics recruited participants with uncontrolled hypertension. Clinics were randomised either to a HBPM group education (Risk Assessment and Management Programme (RAMP-group), or individual counselling of self-management (RAMP-individual). Health literacy was assessed by the Chinese Health Literacy Scale for Chronic Care. Practice and knowledge of HBPM were surveyed by a 10-item HBPM knowledge checklist and patient record review 6 months after interventions. Predictors for regular HBPM and good HBPM knowledge were assessed by multivariate logistic regression models. Results 287 participants (RAMP-group: 151; RAMP-individual: 136) were follow-up for 6 months. 272 participants completed the knowledge questionnaires (response rate 94.8%). 67.8% of the participants performed HBPM regularly, and there was no statistical difference between both interventions. Age more than 65 (adjusted odds ratios (aOR) 2.58, 95% CI 1.37 to 4.86, p=0.003), not working (aOR 2.34, 95% CI 1.10 to 4.97, p=0.027)and adequate health literacy (aOR 2.25, 95% CI 1.28 to 3.95, p=0.005) predicted regular HBPM. Participants in RAMP-group demonstrated a significant lower body weight than those in RAMP-individual (−0.3±2.0 kg vs +0.7 ±1.7 kg, p<0.001).The RAMP-group participants were eight times more likely to have full HBPM knowledge score than the RAMP-individual participants (aOR 8.46, 95% CI 4.68 to 15.28, p<0.001). Conclusion Patients could retain HBPM knowledge better after RAMP-group than RAMP-individual. Older, retired and patients with adequate health literacy were more likely to continue weekly HBPM 6 months after education. Trial registration number NCT02551393.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofPostgraduate Medical Journal-
dc.titleKnowledge and practice of home blood pressure monitoring 6 months after the risk and assessment management programme: does health literacy matter?-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWong, CKH: carlosho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, BMY: mycheung@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, CKH=rp01931-
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, BMY=rp01321-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/postgradmedj-2020-139329-
dc.identifier.hkuros322685-
dc.identifier.spagepostgradmedj-
dc.identifier.epage2020-

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