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Conference Paper: The generational impact on meaning making and well-being of adult children caregivers in dementia caregiving

TitleThe generational impact on meaning making and well-being of adult children caregivers in dementia caregiving
Authors
Issue Date2020
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at https://academic.oup.com/innovateage/
Citation
Gerontological Society of America (GSA) Annual Scientific Meeting 2020: Turning 75: Why Age Matters, Webinar, 4-7 November 2020. In Innovation in Aging, 2020, Vol. 4, No. S1, p. 908 How to Cite?
AbstractChildren caregivers contributed significantly to care and support dementia parents globally. In the caregiving journey, making sense of providing care plays significant role in their caregiving journey. In an ageing society such as Hong Kong, different generations of children caregivers take up dementia caregiver roles. We hypothesized that from studying baby boomers (BB, born in 1946-1964) and generation X (GX, born in 1965-1980), generations have impacts on their meaning making and well-being outcomes. 601 Caregivers completed a paper or online battery of questionnaires on burden (ZBI-4), mental well-being (PHQ-9), caregiving factors (ADL, IADL, caregiving hours, Positive Aspect of Caregiving; PAC) and the meaning making factors (Finding Meaning Through Caregiving; FMTC). Results showed that significant difference between caregivers from two generations. GX have significantly lower meaning made, measured by PAC affirming self and enriching life, as well as FMTC provisional meaning. While they spent less caregiving hours for the more independent care recipients, they suffered from higher burden, higher FMTC loss/powerless and worse psychological well-being (PHQ). The findings demonstrated generation X caregiver suffered from lower level of the meaning made and worse psychological wellbeing outcomes than BB caregivers. Future caregiver studies should take generational effect into account and services shall be provided in a generation-responsive approach. © The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/302016
ISSN
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLou, VW-
dc.contributor.authorLai, DWL-
dc.contributor.authorWong, FKD-
dc.contributor.authorYu, SFD-
dc.contributor.authorChen, S-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, CMR-
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-21T03:30:20Z-
dc.date.available2021-08-21T03:30:20Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationGerontological Society of America (GSA) Annual Scientific Meeting 2020: Turning 75: Why Age Matters, Webinar, 4-7 November 2020. In Innovation in Aging, 2020, Vol. 4, No. S1, p. 908-
dc.identifier.issn2399-5300-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/302016-
dc.description.abstractChildren caregivers contributed significantly to care and support dementia parents globally. In the caregiving journey, making sense of providing care plays significant role in their caregiving journey. In an ageing society such as Hong Kong, different generations of children caregivers take up dementia caregiver roles. We hypothesized that from studying baby boomers (BB, born in 1946-1964) and generation X (GX, born in 1965-1980), generations have impacts on their meaning making and well-being outcomes. 601 Caregivers completed a paper or online battery of questionnaires on burden (ZBI-4), mental well-being (PHQ-9), caregiving factors (ADL, IADL, caregiving hours, Positive Aspect of Caregiving; PAC) and the meaning making factors (Finding Meaning Through Caregiving; FMTC). Results showed that significant difference between caregivers from two generations. GX have significantly lower meaning made, measured by PAC affirming self and enriching life, as well as FMTC provisional meaning. While they spent less caregiving hours for the more independent care recipients, they suffered from higher burden, higher FMTC loss/powerless and worse psychological well-being (PHQ). The findings demonstrated generation X caregiver suffered from lower level of the meaning made and worse psychological wellbeing outcomes than BB caregivers. Future caregiver studies should take generational effect into account and services shall be provided in a generation-responsive approach. © The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at https://academic.oup.com/innovateage/-
dc.relation.ispartofInnovation in Aging-
dc.relation.ispartofGerontological Society of America (GSA) Annual Scientific Meeting 2020-
dc.titleThe generational impact on meaning making and well-being of adult children caregivers in dementia caregiving-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailLou, VW: wlou@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, FKD: dfkwong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYu, SFD: dyu1@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLou, VW=rp00607-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, FKD=rp00593-
dc.identifier.authorityYu, SFD=rp02647-
dc.description.natureabstract-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/geroni/igaa057.3341-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC7740416-
dc.identifier.hkuros324585-
dc.identifier.volume4-
dc.identifier.issueSuppl. 1-
dc.identifier.spage908-
dc.identifier.epage908-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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