File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Active, Yet Little Mobility: Asymmetric Decomposition of H2O2 Is Not Sufficient in Propelling Catalytic Micromotors

TitleActive, Yet Little Mobility: Asymmetric Decomposition of H2O2 Is Not Sufficient in Propelling Catalytic Micromotors
Authors
Issue Date2021
PublisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/journals/jacsat/index.html
Citation
Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2021, v. 143 n. 31, p. 12154-12164 How to Cite?
AbstractA popular principle in designing chemical micromachines is to take advantage of asymmetric chemical reactions such as the catalytic decomposition of H2O2. Contrary to intuition, we use Janus micromotors half-coated with platinum (Pt) or catalase as an example to show that this ingredient is not sufficient in powering a micromotor into self-propulsion. In particular, by annealing a thin Pt film on a SiO2 microsphere, the resulting microsphere half-decorated with discrete Pt nanoparticles swims ∼80% more slowly than its unannealed counterpart in H2O2, even though they both catalytically produce comparable amounts of oxygen. Similarly, SiO2 microspheres half-functionalized with the enzyme catalase show negligible self-propulsion despite high catalytic activity toward decomposing H2O2. In addition to highlighting how surface morphology of a catalytic cap enables/disables a chemical micromotor, this study offers a refreshed perspective in understanding how chemistry powers nano- and microscopic objects (or not): our results are consistent with a self-electrophoresis mechanism that emphasizes the electrochemical decomposition of H2O2 over nonelectrochemical pathways. More broadly, our finding is a critical piece of the puzzle in understanding and designing nano- and micromachines, in developing capable model systems of active colloids, and in relating enzymes to active matter.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/303924
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 15.419
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 7.115

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLyu, X-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, X-
dc.contributor.authorZhou, C-
dc.contributor.authorDuan, S-
dc.contributor.authorXu, P-
dc.contributor.authorDAI, J-
dc.contributor.authorChen, X-
dc.contributor.authorPeng, Y-
dc.contributor.authorCui, D-
dc.contributor.authorTang, J-
dc.contributor.authorMa, X-
dc.contributor.authorWang, W-
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-23T08:52:41Z-
dc.date.available2021-09-23T08:52:41Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of the American Chemical Society, 2021, v. 143 n. 31, p. 12154-12164-
dc.identifier.issn0002-7863-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/303924-
dc.description.abstractA popular principle in designing chemical micromachines is to take advantage of asymmetric chemical reactions such as the catalytic decomposition of H2O2. Contrary to intuition, we use Janus micromotors half-coated with platinum (Pt) or catalase as an example to show that this ingredient is not sufficient in powering a micromotor into self-propulsion. In particular, by annealing a thin Pt film on a SiO2 microsphere, the resulting microsphere half-decorated with discrete Pt nanoparticles swims ∼80% more slowly than its unannealed counterpart in H2O2, even though they both catalytically produce comparable amounts of oxygen. Similarly, SiO2 microspheres half-functionalized with the enzyme catalase show negligible self-propulsion despite high catalytic activity toward decomposing H2O2. In addition to highlighting how surface morphology of a catalytic cap enables/disables a chemical micromotor, this study offers a refreshed perspective in understanding how chemistry powers nano- and microscopic objects (or not): our results are consistent with a self-electrophoresis mechanism that emphasizes the electrochemical decomposition of H2O2 over nonelectrochemical pathways. More broadly, our finding is a critical piece of the puzzle in understanding and designing nano- and micromachines, in developing capable model systems of active colloids, and in relating enzymes to active matter.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/journals/jacsat/index.html-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the American Chemical Society-
dc.rightsThis document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in [JournalTitle], copyright © American Chemical Society after peer review and technical editing by the publisher. To access the final edited and published work see [insert ACS Articles on Request author-directed link to Published Work, see http://pubs.acs.org/page/policy/articlesonrequest/index.html].-
dc.titleActive, Yet Little Mobility: Asymmetric Decomposition of H2O2 Is Not Sufficient in Propelling Catalytic Micromotors-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTang, J: jinyao@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTang, J=rp01677-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/jacs.1c04501-
dc.identifier.pmid34339185-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85113176048-
dc.identifier.hkuros325088-
dc.identifier.volume143-
dc.identifier.issue31-
dc.identifier.spage12154-
dc.identifier.epage12164-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats