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Article: Temperature signals complicate tree-ring precipitation reconstructions on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau

TitleTemperature signals complicate tree-ring precipitation reconstructions on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau
Authors
KeywordsTree-ring width
Tempertature signals
Precipitation reconstruction
Low-frequency trends
Climate signal separation
Issue Date2021
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/gloplacha
Citation
Global and Planetary Change, 2021, v. 200, p. article no. 103460 How to Cite?
AbstractTree-ring width chronologies are a critically important material to reconstruct past precipitation variability on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau (NTP). However, temperature signals are often encoded in these chronologies, which complicate the precipitation reconstructions and should be carefully assessed. Here, a dataset of 487 Qilian juniper (Juniperus przewalskii Kom.) tree-ring width series from 16 sites on the NTP were collected to investigate the influence of different temperature signals on the precipitation reconstructions. Correlation analysis showed that all tree-ring series recorded similar precipitation information, but had positive (p ≤ 0.05, Group1), weak (p > 0.05, Group2), and negative (p ≤ 0.05, Group3) correlations with temperature, respectively. In view of this, all tree-ring series were divided into three groups to develop chronologies to reconstruct local precipitation. During the calibration period of 1957–2011 CE, the Group1 reconstruction had the fastest uptrend, which almost overlapped the observed precipitation; the Group2 reconstruction showed a slower uptrend, whereas the Group3 reconstruction lacked an uptrend. As a result, we get different results when the reconstructions were used to assess the current precipitation status over the past millennium. The Group1 (Group2) reconstructions showed that the recent 20 (10) years were the highest precipitation period over the past millennium, whereas the Group3 reconstruction did not capture this phenomenon. Therefore, we caution that the temperature effects should be evaluated carefully before tree-ring width chronologies being employed to study past precipitation variability.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/304044
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 5.114
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.706
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiu, W-
dc.contributor.authorGou, X-
dc.contributor.authorLi, J-
dc.contributor.authorHuo, Y-
dc.contributor.authorYang, M-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, J-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, W-
dc.contributor.authorYin, D-
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-23T08:54:28Z-
dc.date.available2021-09-23T08:54:28Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationGlobal and Planetary Change, 2021, v. 200, p. article no. 103460-
dc.identifier.issn0921-8181-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/304044-
dc.description.abstractTree-ring width chronologies are a critically important material to reconstruct past precipitation variability on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau (NTP). However, temperature signals are often encoded in these chronologies, which complicate the precipitation reconstructions and should be carefully assessed. Here, a dataset of 487 Qilian juniper (Juniperus przewalskii Kom.) tree-ring width series from 16 sites on the NTP were collected to investigate the influence of different temperature signals on the precipitation reconstructions. Correlation analysis showed that all tree-ring series recorded similar precipitation information, but had positive (p ≤ 0.05, Group1), weak (p > 0.05, Group2), and negative (p ≤ 0.05, Group3) correlations with temperature, respectively. In view of this, all tree-ring series were divided into three groups to develop chronologies to reconstruct local precipitation. During the calibration period of 1957–2011 CE, the Group1 reconstruction had the fastest uptrend, which almost overlapped the observed precipitation; the Group2 reconstruction showed a slower uptrend, whereas the Group3 reconstruction lacked an uptrend. As a result, we get different results when the reconstructions were used to assess the current precipitation status over the past millennium. The Group1 (Group2) reconstructions showed that the recent 20 (10) years were the highest precipitation period over the past millennium, whereas the Group3 reconstruction did not capture this phenomenon. Therefore, we caution that the temperature effects should be evaluated carefully before tree-ring width chronologies being employed to study past precipitation variability.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/gloplacha-
dc.relation.ispartofGlobal and Planetary Change-
dc.subjectTree-ring width-
dc.subjectTempertature signals-
dc.subjectPrecipitation reconstruction-
dc.subjectLow-frequency trends-
dc.subjectClimate signal separation-
dc.titleTemperature signals complicate tree-ring precipitation reconstructions on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLi, J: jinbao@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLi, J=rp01699-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.gloplacha.2021.103460-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85102061928-
dc.identifier.hkuros325011-
dc.identifier.volume200-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 103460-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 103460-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000640389200003-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

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