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Article: Behavior‐partitioned diversity reveals differential habitat values of gardens to butterfly communities

TitleBehavior‐partitioned diversity reveals differential habitat values of gardens to butterfly communities
Authors
Keywordsbehaviors
butterflies
complementary habitats
conservation
diversity
Issue Date2021
PublisherWiley, published in association with Ecological Society of America. The Journal's web site is located at https://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/19395582
Citation
Ecological Applications, 2021, v. 31 n. 4, p. article no. e02331 How to Cite?
AbstractDiversity metrics, essential for habitat evaluation in conservation, are often based on occurrences records with little consideration of behavioral ecology. As species use diverse habitats to perform different behaviors, reliance on occurrence records alone will fail to reveal environmental conditions shaping the behavioral importance of habitats with respect to resource exploitation. Here, we integrated occurrence and behavioral records to quantify diversity and assessed how environmental determinants shape the behavioral importance of gardens to butterflies across Hong Kong. We conducted standardized butterfly sampling and behavioral observation, and recorded environmental variables related to climate, habitat quality, and landscape connectivity. We found differential responses of diversity and behavioral diversity metrics to environmental variables. Connectivity increased taxonomic richness based on occurrence and flying across records, while temperature reduced richness based on occurrence, settling and interaction records. Floral abundance increased richness based on nectaring records only. No environmental variable promoted the average number of behavioral types observed in each taxon. Our results suggest that connectivity and temperature determine the richness of butterflies reaching gardens, while floral abundance determines whether butterflies use the sites as nectaring grounds via modifying species behaviors. Our study demonstrates the utility in integrating behavioral and diversity data to reveal how environmental conditions shape behavioral importance of habitats.
DescriptionBronze open access
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/304096
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 4.657
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.864

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLo, FHY-
dc.contributor.authorTsang, TPN-
dc.contributor.authorBonebrake, TC-
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-23T08:55:10Z-
dc.date.available2021-09-23T08:55:10Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationEcological Applications, 2021, v. 31 n. 4, p. article no. e02331-
dc.identifier.issn1051-0761-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/304096-
dc.descriptionBronze open access-
dc.description.abstractDiversity metrics, essential for habitat evaluation in conservation, are often based on occurrences records with little consideration of behavioral ecology. As species use diverse habitats to perform different behaviors, reliance on occurrence records alone will fail to reveal environmental conditions shaping the behavioral importance of habitats with respect to resource exploitation. Here, we integrated occurrence and behavioral records to quantify diversity and assessed how environmental determinants shape the behavioral importance of gardens to butterflies across Hong Kong. We conducted standardized butterfly sampling and behavioral observation, and recorded environmental variables related to climate, habitat quality, and landscape connectivity. We found differential responses of diversity and behavioral diversity metrics to environmental variables. Connectivity increased taxonomic richness based on occurrence and flying across records, while temperature reduced richness based on occurrence, settling and interaction records. Floral abundance increased richness based on nectaring records only. No environmental variable promoted the average number of behavioral types observed in each taxon. Our results suggest that connectivity and temperature determine the richness of butterflies reaching gardens, while floral abundance determines whether butterflies use the sites as nectaring grounds via modifying species behaviors. Our study demonstrates the utility in integrating behavioral and diversity data to reveal how environmental conditions shape behavioral importance of habitats.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley, published in association with Ecological Society of America. The Journal's web site is located at https://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/19395582-
dc.relation.ispartofEcological Applications-
dc.rightsSubmitted (preprint) Version This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. Accepted (peer-reviewed) Version This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.subjectbehaviors-
dc.subjectbutterflies-
dc.subjectcomplementary habitats-
dc.subjectconservation-
dc.subjectdiversity-
dc.titleBehavior‐partitioned diversity reveals differential habitat values of gardens to butterfly communities-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTsang, TPN: tpaknok@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailBonebrake, TC: tbone@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityBonebrake, TC=rp01676-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/eap.2331-
dc.identifier.pmid33756047-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85104962989-
dc.identifier.hkuros325181-
dc.identifier.volume31-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. e02331-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. e02331-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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