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Article: A Prevention Program for Insomnia in At-risk Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Study

TitleA Prevention Program for Insomnia in At-risk Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Study
Authors
Issue Date2021
PublisherAmerican Academy of Pediatrics. The Journal's web site is located at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/
Citation
Pediatrics, 2021, v. 147 n. 3, p. article no. e2020006833 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVES: To prevent the future development of insomnia in at-risk adolescents. METHODS: A randomized controlled trial comparing 4 weekly insomnia prevention program with a nonactive control group. Subjects were assessed at baseline, postintervention, and 6 and 12 months after intervention. Assessors were blinded to the randomization. Analyses were conducted on the basis of the intention-to-treat principles. RESULTS: A total of 242 adolescents with family history of insomnia and subthreshold insomnia symptoms were randomly assigned to an intervention group (n = 121; mean age = 14.7 ± 1.8; female: 51.2%) or control group (n = 121; mean age = 15.0 ± 1.7; female: 62.0%). There was a lower incidence rate of insomnia disorder (both acute and chronic) in the intervention group compared with the control group (5.8% vs 20.7%; P = .002; number needed to treat = 6.7; hazard ratio = 0.29; 95% confidence interval: 0.12–0.66; P = .003) over the 12-month follow-up. The intervention group had decreased insomnia symptoms (P = .03) and reduced vulnerability to stress-related insomnia (P = .03) at postintervention and throughout the 12-month follow-up. Decreased daytime sleepiness (P = .04), better sleep hygiene practices (P = .02), and increased total sleep time (P = .05) were observed at postintervention. The intervention group also reported fewer depressive symptoms at 12-month follow-up (P = .02) compared with the control group. CONCLUSIONS: A brief cognitive behavioral program is effective in preventing the onset of insomnia and improving the vulnerability factors and functioning outcomes.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/306646
ISSN
2021 Impact Factor: 9.703
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.611
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, NY-
dc.contributor.authorLi, SX-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, J-
dc.contributor.authorLam, SP-
dc.contributor.authorKwok, APL-
dc.contributor.authorYu, MWM-
dc.contributor.authorChan, JWY-
dc.contributor.authorLi, AM-
dc.contributor.authorMorin, CM-
dc.contributor.authorWing, YK-
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-22T07:37:36Z-
dc.date.available2021-10-22T07:37:36Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationPediatrics, 2021, v. 147 n. 3, p. article no. e2020006833-
dc.identifier.issn0031-4005-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/306646-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To prevent the future development of insomnia in at-risk adolescents. METHODS: A randomized controlled trial comparing 4 weekly insomnia prevention program with a nonactive control group. Subjects were assessed at baseline, postintervention, and 6 and 12 months after intervention. Assessors were blinded to the randomization. Analyses were conducted on the basis of the intention-to-treat principles. RESULTS: A total of 242 adolescents with family history of insomnia and subthreshold insomnia symptoms were randomly assigned to an intervention group (n = 121; mean age = 14.7 ± 1.8; female: 51.2%) or control group (n = 121; mean age = 15.0 ± 1.7; female: 62.0%). There was a lower incidence rate of insomnia disorder (both acute and chronic) in the intervention group compared with the control group (5.8% vs 20.7%; P = .002; number needed to treat = 6.7; hazard ratio = 0.29; 95% confidence interval: 0.12–0.66; P = .003) over the 12-month follow-up. The intervention group had decreased insomnia symptoms (P = .03) and reduced vulnerability to stress-related insomnia (P = .03) at postintervention and throughout the 12-month follow-up. Decreased daytime sleepiness (P = .04), better sleep hygiene practices (P = .02), and increased total sleep time (P = .05) were observed at postintervention. The intervention group also reported fewer depressive symptoms at 12-month follow-up (P = .02) compared with the control group. CONCLUSIONS: A brief cognitive behavioral program is effective in preventing the onset of insomnia and improving the vulnerability factors and functioning outcomes.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Academy of Pediatrics. The Journal's web site is located at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofPediatrics-
dc.titleA Prevention Program for Insomnia in At-risk Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Study-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLi, SX: shirleyx@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLi, SX=rp02114-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1542/peds.2020-006833-
dc.identifier.pmid33627370-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85102537255-
dc.identifier.hkuros328785-
dc.identifier.volume147-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. e2020006833-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. e2020006833-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000624595400004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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