File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Impact of a Family Economic Intervention (Bridges) on Health Functioning of Adolescents Orphaned by HIV/AIDS: A 5-Year (2012–2017) Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial in Uganda

TitleImpact of a Family Economic Intervention (Bridges) on Health Functioning of Adolescents Orphaned by HIV/AIDS: A 5-Year (2012–2017) Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial in Uganda
Authors
Issue Date2021
PublisherAmerican Public Health Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ajph.org
Citation
American Journal of Public Health, 2021, v. 111 n. 3, p. 504-513 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives. To investigate the long-term impacts of a family economic intervention on physical, mental, and sexual health of adolescents orphaned by AIDS in Uganda. Methods. Students in grades 5 and 6 from 48 primary schools in Uganda were randomly assigned at the school level (cluster randomization) to 1 of 3 conditions: (1) control (n = 487; 16 schools), (2) Bridges (1:1 savings match rate; n = 396; 16 schools), or (3) Bridges PLUS (2:1 savings match rate; n = 500; 16 schools). Results. At 24 months, compared with participants in the control condition, Bridges and Bridges PLUS participants reported higher physical health scores, lower depressive symptoms, and higher self-concept and self-efficacy. During the same period, Bridges participants reported lower sexual risk-taking intentions compared with the other 2 study conditions. At 48 months, Bridges and Bridges PLUS participants reported better self-rated health, higher savings, and lower food insecurity. During the same period, Bridges PLUS participants reported reduced hopelessness, and greater self-concept and self-efficacy. At 24 and 48 months, Bridges PLUS participants reported higher savings than Bridges participants. Conclusions. Economic interventions targeting families raising adolescents orphaned by AIDS can contribute to long-term positive health and overall well-being of these families. Trial Registration. ClinicalTrials.gov registration no. NCT01447615.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/307921
ISSN
2021 Impact Factor: 11.561
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.284
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSsewamala, FM-
dc.contributor.authorWang, JSH-
dc.contributor.authorBrathwaite, R-
dc.contributor.authorSun, S-
dc.contributor.authorMayo-Wilson, LJ-
dc.contributor.authorNeilands, TB-
dc.contributor.authorBrooks-Gunn, J-
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-12T13:39:51Z-
dc.date.available2021-11-12T13:39:51Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal of Public Health, 2021, v. 111 n. 3, p. 504-513-
dc.identifier.issn0090-0036-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/307921-
dc.description.abstractObjectives. To investigate the long-term impacts of a family economic intervention on physical, mental, and sexual health of adolescents orphaned by AIDS in Uganda. Methods. Students in grades 5 and 6 from 48 primary schools in Uganda were randomly assigned at the school level (cluster randomization) to 1 of 3 conditions: (1) control (n = 487; 16 schools), (2) Bridges (1:1 savings match rate; n = 396; 16 schools), or (3) Bridges PLUS (2:1 savings match rate; n = 500; 16 schools). Results. At 24 months, compared with participants in the control condition, Bridges and Bridges PLUS participants reported higher physical health scores, lower depressive symptoms, and higher self-concept and self-efficacy. During the same period, Bridges participants reported lower sexual risk-taking intentions compared with the other 2 study conditions. At 48 months, Bridges and Bridges PLUS participants reported better self-rated health, higher savings, and lower food insecurity. During the same period, Bridges PLUS participants reported reduced hopelessness, and greater self-concept and self-efficacy. At 24 and 48 months, Bridges PLUS participants reported higher savings than Bridges participants. Conclusions. Economic interventions targeting families raising adolescents orphaned by AIDS can contribute to long-term positive health and overall well-being of these families. Trial Registration. ClinicalTrials.gov registration no. NCT01447615.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Public Health Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ajph.org-
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Public Health-
dc.titleImpact of a Family Economic Intervention (Bridges) on Health Functioning of Adolescents Orphaned by HIV/AIDS: A 5-Year (2012–2017) Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial in Uganda-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWang, JSH: jshwang@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWang, JSH=rp02181-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.2105/AJPH.2020.306044-
dc.identifier.pmid33476237-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC7893332-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85102094349-
dc.identifier.hkuros329702-
dc.identifier.volume111-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage504-
dc.identifier.epage513-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000639017000043-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats