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Article: An Internet Quiz Game Intervention for Adolescent Alcohol Drinking: A Clustered RCT

TitleAn Internet Quiz Game Intervention for Adolescent Alcohol Drinking: A Clustered RCT
Authors
Issue Date2021
PublisherAmerican Academy of Pediatrics. The Journal's web site is located at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/
Citation
Pediatrics, 2021, v. 148 n. 6, p. article no. e2021051005 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Interventions on adolescent drinking have yielded mixed results. We assessed the effectiveness of an Internet quiz game intervention compared to conventional health education. METHODS In this cluster randomized controlled trial with parallel group design, we randomly allocated 30 participating schools to the Internet quiz game intervention or the conventional health education (comparison) group, with 1:1 ratio. Students of Hong Kong secondary schools (aged 12–15 years) were recruited. The intervention was a 4-week Web-based quiz game competition in which participating students answered 1000 alcohol-related multiple-choice quiz questions. The comparison group received a printed promotional leaflet and hyperlinks to alcohol-related information. RESULTS Of 30 eligible schools, 15 (4294 students) were randomly assigned to the Internet quiz game intervention group and 15 (3498 students) to the comparison group. Average age of participants was 13.30 years. No significant between-group differences were identified at baseline. Overall retention rate for students was 86.0%. At 1-month follow-up, fewer students in the intervention group reported drinking (9.8% vs 12.1%, risk ratio 0.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.68 to 0.92; P = .003), and those who drank reported drinking less alcohol (standardized difference β −0.06, 95% CI −0.11 to −0.01; P = .02). Between-group differences remained statistically significant at 3-month follow-up (10.4% vs 11.6%, risk ratio 0.86, 95% CI 0.74 to 0.999; P = .048; β −0.06, 95% CI −0.11 to −0.01; P = .02). CONCLUSIONS The Internet quiz game intervention reduced underage drinking by 21% at 1-month and 14% at 3-month follow-up compared with conventional health education.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/309155
ISSN
2021 Impact Factor: 9.703
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.611

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, FK-
dc.contributor.authorTung, KTS-
dc.contributor.authorWong, RS-
dc.contributor.authorChan, KL-
dc.contributor.authorWong, WHS-
dc.contributor.authorHo, SY-
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH-
dc.contributor.authorMirpuri, S-
dc.contributor.authorVan Voorhees, B-
dc.contributor.authorFu, KW-
dc.contributor.authorChow, CB-
dc.contributor.authorChua, G-
dc.contributor.authorTso, W-
dc.contributor.authorJiang, F-
dc.contributor.authorRich, M-
dc.contributor.authorIp, P-
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-14T01:41:17Z-
dc.date.available2021-12-14T01:41:17Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationPediatrics, 2021, v. 148 n. 6, p. article no. e2021051005-
dc.identifier.issn0031-4005-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/309155-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES Interventions on adolescent drinking have yielded mixed results. We assessed the effectiveness of an Internet quiz game intervention compared to conventional health education. METHODS In this cluster randomized controlled trial with parallel group design, we randomly allocated 30 participating schools to the Internet quiz game intervention or the conventional health education (comparison) group, with 1:1 ratio. Students of Hong Kong secondary schools (aged 12–15 years) were recruited. The intervention was a 4-week Web-based quiz game competition in which participating students answered 1000 alcohol-related multiple-choice quiz questions. The comparison group received a printed promotional leaflet and hyperlinks to alcohol-related information. RESULTS Of 30 eligible schools, 15 (4294 students) were randomly assigned to the Internet quiz game intervention group and 15 (3498 students) to the comparison group. Average age of participants was 13.30 years. No significant between-group differences were identified at baseline. Overall retention rate for students was 86.0%. At 1-month follow-up, fewer students in the intervention group reported drinking (9.8% vs 12.1%, risk ratio 0.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.68 to 0.92; P = .003), and those who drank reported drinking less alcohol (standardized difference β −0.06, 95% CI −0.11 to −0.01; P = .02). Between-group differences remained statistically significant at 3-month follow-up (10.4% vs 11.6%, risk ratio 0.86, 95% CI 0.74 to 0.999; P = .048; β −0.06, 95% CI −0.11 to −0.01; P = .02). CONCLUSIONS The Internet quiz game intervention reduced underage drinking by 21% at 1-month and 14% at 3-month follow-up compared with conventional health education.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Academy of Pediatrics. The Journal's web site is located at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofPediatrics-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleAn Internet Quiz Game Intervention for Adolescent Alcohol Drinking: A Clustered RCT-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTung, KTS: ktung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, RS: rosawong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, WHS: whswong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHo, SY: syho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFu, KW: kwfu@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChow, CB: chowcb@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChua, G: cgt560@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTso, W: wytso@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailIp, P: patricip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, RS=rp02804-
dc.identifier.authorityHo, SY=rp00427-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326-
dc.identifier.authorityFu, KW=rp00552-
dc.identifier.authorityChua, G=rp02684-
dc.identifier.authorityTso, W=rp01517-
dc.identifier.authorityIp, P=rp01337-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1542/peds.2021-051005-
dc.identifier.pmid34841427-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85121488422-
dc.identifier.hkuros331044-
dc.identifier.volume148-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. e2021051005-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. e2021051005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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