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Article: Appropriate Telemedicine Utilization in Spine Surgery: Results From a Delphi Study

TitleAppropriate Telemedicine Utilization in Spine Surgery: Results From a Delphi Study
Authors
Issue Date2022
PublisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.lww.com/spinejournal/pages/default.aspx
Citation
Spine, 2022, v. 47 n. 8, p. 583-590 How to Cite?
AbstractStudy design: Delphi expert panel consensus. Objective: To obtain expert consensus on best practices for appropriate telemedicine utilization in spine surgery. Summary of background data: Several studies have shown high patient satisfaction associated with telemedicine during the COVID-19 peak pandemic period as well as after easing of restrictions. As this technology will most likely continue to be employed, there is a need to define appropriate utilization. Methods: An expert panel consisting of 27 spine surgeons from various countries was assembled in February 2021. A two-round consensus-based Delphi method was used to generate consensus statements on various aspects of telemedicine (separated as video visits or audio visits) including themes, such as patient location and impact of patient diagnosis, on assessment of new patients. Topics with ≥75% agreement were categorized as having achieved a consensus. Results: The expert panel reviewed a total of 59 statements. Of these, 32 achieved consensus. The panel had consensus that video visits could be utilized regardless of patient location and that video visits are appropriate for evaluating as well as indicating for surgery multiple common spine pathologies, such as lumbar stenosis, lumbar radiculopathy, and cervical radiculopathy. Finally, the panel had consensus that video visits could be appropriate for a variety of visit types including early, midterm, longer term postoperative follow-up, follow-up for imaging review, and follow-up after an intervention (i.e., physical therapy, injection). Conclusion: Although telemedicine was initially introduced out of necessity, this technology most likely will remain due to evidence of high patient satisfaction and significant cost savings. This study was able to provide a framework for appropriate telemedicine utilization in spine surgery from a panel of experts. However, several questions remain for future research, such as whether or not an in-person consultation is necessary prior to surgery and which physical exam maneuvers are appropriate for telemedicine.Level of Evidence: 4. Copyright © 2022 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/311272
ISSN
2021 Impact Factor: 3.241
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.657

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorIyer, S-
dc.contributor.authorBovonratwet, P-
dc.contributor.authorSamartzis, D-
dc.contributor.authorSchoenfeld, AJ-
dc.contributor.authorAn, HS-
dc.contributor.authorAwwad, W-
dc.contributor.authorBlumenthal, SL-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, JPY-
dc.contributor.authorDerman, PB-
dc.contributor.authorEl-Sharkawi, M-
dc.contributor.authorFreedman, BA-
dc.contributor.authorHartl, R-
dc.contributor.authorKang, JD-
dc.contributor.authorKim, HJ-
dc.contributor.authorLouie, PK-
dc.contributor.authorLudwig, SC-
dc.contributor.authorNeva, MH-
dc.contributor.authorPham, MH-
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, FM-
dc.contributor.authorQureshi, SA-
dc.contributor.authorRadcliff, KE-
dc.contributor.authorRiew, KD-
dc.contributor.authorSandhu, HS-
dc.contributor.authorSciubba, DM-
dc.contributor.authorSethi, RK-
dc.contributor.authorValacco, M-
dc.contributor.authorZaidi, HA-
dc.contributor.authorZygourakis, CC-
dc.contributor.authorMakhni, MC-
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-21T08:47:20Z-
dc.date.available2022-03-21T08:47:20Z-
dc.date.issued2022-
dc.identifier.citationSpine, 2022, v. 47 n. 8, p. 583-590-
dc.identifier.issn0362-2436-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/311272-
dc.description.abstractStudy design: Delphi expert panel consensus. Objective: To obtain expert consensus on best practices for appropriate telemedicine utilization in spine surgery. Summary of background data: Several studies have shown high patient satisfaction associated with telemedicine during the COVID-19 peak pandemic period as well as after easing of restrictions. As this technology will most likely continue to be employed, there is a need to define appropriate utilization. Methods: An expert panel consisting of 27 spine surgeons from various countries was assembled in February 2021. A two-round consensus-based Delphi method was used to generate consensus statements on various aspects of telemedicine (separated as video visits or audio visits) including themes, such as patient location and impact of patient diagnosis, on assessment of new patients. Topics with ≥75% agreement were categorized as having achieved a consensus. Results: The expert panel reviewed a total of 59 statements. Of these, 32 achieved consensus. The panel had consensus that video visits could be utilized regardless of patient location and that video visits are appropriate for evaluating as well as indicating for surgery multiple common spine pathologies, such as lumbar stenosis, lumbar radiculopathy, and cervical radiculopathy. Finally, the panel had consensus that video visits could be appropriate for a variety of visit types including early, midterm, longer term postoperative follow-up, follow-up for imaging review, and follow-up after an intervention (i.e., physical therapy, injection). Conclusion: Although telemedicine was initially introduced out of necessity, this technology most likely will remain due to evidence of high patient satisfaction and significant cost savings. This study was able to provide a framework for appropriate telemedicine utilization in spine surgery from a panel of experts. However, several questions remain for future research, such as whether or not an in-person consultation is necessary prior to surgery and which physical exam maneuvers are appropriate for telemedicine.Level of Evidence: 4. Copyright © 2022 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.lww.com/spinejournal/pages/default.aspx-
dc.relation.ispartofSpine-
dc.titleAppropriate Telemedicine Utilization in Spine Surgery: Results From a Delphi Study-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, JPY: cheungjp@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, JPY=rp01685-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/BRS.0000000000004339-
dc.identifier.pmid35125460-
dc.identifier.hkuros332166-
dc.identifier.volume47-
dc.identifier.issue8-
dc.identifier.spage583-
dc.identifier.epage590-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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