File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: IQ and adolescent self-harm behaviours in the ALSPAC birth cohort

TitleIQ and adolescent self-harm behaviours in the ALSPAC birth cohort
Authors
KeywordsSuicidal thoughts
Suicidal plans
Self-harm
Suicidal intent
IQ
ALSPAC
Issue Date2014
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jad
Citation
Journal of Affective Disorders, 2014, v. 152-154, p. 175-182 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground Low IQ is associated with an increased risk of suicide and suicide attempt in adults, but less is known about the relationship between IQ and aspects of suicidal/self-harm behaviours in adolescence. Methods We used data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), a population-based prospective UK cohort. Binomial and multinomial logistic regression models were used to examine the association of IQ measured at age 8 with suicide-related outcomes amongst 4810 adolescents aged 16–17 years. Results There was some evidence that associations differed in boys and girls (p values for interaction ranged between 0.06 and 0.25). In boys higher IQ was associated with increased risk of suicidal thoughts (adjusted odds ratio per 10 point increase in IQ score=1.14, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.01–1.28) and suicidal plans (1.15, 95% CI 0.93–1.43), although statistical evidence for the latter association was limited. There was also evidence for an association with non-suicidal self-harm (1.24, 95% CI 1.08–1.45) but not suicidal self-harm (1.04, 95% CI 0.86–1.25). In girls higher IQ was associated with increased risk of non-suicidal self-harm (1.11, 95% CI 1.02–1.22) but not suicidal thoughts, suicidal plans or suicidal self-harm. Limitations Loss to follow up and questionnaire non-response may have led to selection bias. Conclusion In contrast to previous studies of IQ–suicide associations in adults, we found that higher IQ was associated with an increased risk of non-suicidal self-harm in male and female adolescents and suicidal thoughts in males. Associations of IQ with self-harm differed for self-harm with and without suicidal intent, suggesting that the aetiology of these behaviours may differ.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/191541
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 3.786
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.927
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChang, SS-
dc.contributor.authorChen, YY-
dc.contributor.authorHeron, J-
dc.contributor.authorKidger, J-
dc.contributor.authorLewis, G-
dc.contributor.authorGunnell, D-
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-15T07:09:21Z-
dc.date.available2013-10-15T07:09:21Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Affective Disorders, 2014, v. 152-154, p. 175-182-
dc.identifier.issn0165-0327-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/191541-
dc.description.abstractBackground Low IQ is associated with an increased risk of suicide and suicide attempt in adults, but less is known about the relationship between IQ and aspects of suicidal/self-harm behaviours in adolescence. Methods We used data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), a population-based prospective UK cohort. Binomial and multinomial logistic regression models were used to examine the association of IQ measured at age 8 with suicide-related outcomes amongst 4810 adolescents aged 16–17 years. Results There was some evidence that associations differed in boys and girls (p values for interaction ranged between 0.06 and 0.25). In boys higher IQ was associated with increased risk of suicidal thoughts (adjusted odds ratio per 10 point increase in IQ score=1.14, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.01–1.28) and suicidal plans (1.15, 95% CI 0.93–1.43), although statistical evidence for the latter association was limited. There was also evidence for an association with non-suicidal self-harm (1.24, 95% CI 1.08–1.45) but not suicidal self-harm (1.04, 95% CI 0.86–1.25). In girls higher IQ was associated with increased risk of non-suicidal self-harm (1.11, 95% CI 1.02–1.22) but not suicidal thoughts, suicidal plans or suicidal self-harm. Limitations Loss to follow up and questionnaire non-response may have led to selection bias. Conclusion In contrast to previous studies of IQ–suicide associations in adults, we found that higher IQ was associated with an increased risk of non-suicidal self-harm in male and female adolescents and suicidal thoughts in males. Associations of IQ with self-harm differed for self-harm with and without suicidal intent, suggesting that the aetiology of these behaviours may differ.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jad-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Affective Disorders-
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Affective Disorders. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Affective Disorders, 2014, v. 152-154, p. 175-182. DOI: 10.1016/j.jad.2013.09.005-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectSuicidal thoughts-
dc.subjectSuicidal plans-
dc.subjectSelf-harm-
dc.subjectSuicidal intent-
dc.subjectIQ-
dc.subjectALSPAC-
dc.titleIQ and adolescent self-harm behaviours in the ALSPAC birth cohort-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChang, SS: sschang@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChang, SS=rp01582-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jad.2013.09.005-
dc.identifier.pmid24080206-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84889101836-
dc.identifier.hkuros226528-
dc.identifier.volume152-154-
dc.identifier.spage175-
dc.identifier.epage182-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000327763600023-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats