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Article: Mechanical oscillations enhance gene delivery into suspended cells

TitleMechanical oscillations enhance gene delivery into suspended cells
Authors
Issue Date2016
PublisherNature Publishing Group: Open Access Journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/srep/index.html
Citation
Scientific Reports, 2016, v. 6, article no. 22824, p. 1-9 How to Cite?
AbstractSuspended cells are difficult to be transfected by common biochemical methods which require cell attachment to a substrate. Mechanical oscillations of suspended cells at certain frequencies are found to result in significant increase in membrane permeability and potency for delivery of nano-particles and genetic materials into the cells. Nanomaterials including siRNAs are found to penetrate into suspended cells after subjecting to short-time mechanical oscillations, which would otherwise not affect the viability of the cells. Theoretical analysis indicates significant deformation of the actin-filament network in the cytoskeleton cortex during mechanical oscillations at the experimental frequency, which is likely to rupture the soft phospholipid bilayer leading to increased membrane permeability. The results here indicate a new method for enhancing cell transfection.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/227340
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 3.998
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.073
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Z-
dc.contributor.authorSun, X-
dc.contributor.authorMa, J-
dc.contributor.authorMan, CH-
dc.contributor.authorWong, AST-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, AYH-
dc.contributor.authorNgan, AHW-
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-18T09:09:53Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-18T09:09:53Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationScientific Reports, 2016, v. 6, article no. 22824, p. 1-9-
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/227340-
dc.description.abstractSuspended cells are difficult to be transfected by common biochemical methods which require cell attachment to a substrate. Mechanical oscillations of suspended cells at certain frequencies are found to result in significant increase in membrane permeability and potency for delivery of nano-particles and genetic materials into the cells. Nanomaterials including siRNAs are found to penetrate into suspended cells after subjecting to short-time mechanical oscillations, which would otherwise not affect the viability of the cells. Theoretical analysis indicates significant deformation of the actin-filament network in the cytoskeleton cortex during mechanical oscillations at the experimental frequency, which is likely to rupture the soft phospholipid bilayer leading to increased membrane permeability. The results here indicate a new method for enhancing cell transfection.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group: Open Access Journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/srep/index.html-
dc.relation.ispartofScientific Reports-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleMechanical oscillations enhance gene delivery into suspended cells-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailZhou, Z: zlzhou@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailMan, CH: csman729@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, AST: awong1@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLeung, AYH: ayhleung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailNgan, AHW: hwngan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityMan, CH=rp02543-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, AST=rp00805-
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, AYH=rp00265-
dc.identifier.authorityNgan, AHW=rp00225-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep22824-
dc.identifier.pmid26956215-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4783776-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84960341699-
dc.identifier.hkuros259359-
dc.identifier.volume6-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 22824, p. 1-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 22824, p. 9-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000371627500001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.issnl2045-2322-

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