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Article: Thermal creep and relaxation of prestressing steel

TitleThermal creep and relaxation of prestressing steel
Authors
KeywordsNumerical model
Prestressing steel
Thermal creep
Thermal relaxation
Issue Date2016
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/conbuildmat
Citation
Construction and Building Materials, 2016, v. 128, p. 118-127 How to Cite?
AbstractThe thermal creep and relaxation of prestressing steel are crucial to the permanent loss of prestress in post-tensioned concrete structures after fire. Harmathy’s creep model is widely used to account for the irrecoverable thermal creep strain. In view of advances in steel manufacture, it is desirable to determine the relevant parameters of Harmathy’s creep model for common prestressing steel being used. Recently, Gales et al. found that the creep parameters obtained by Harmathy and Stanzak in the 1970s were out of date as the use of these parameters could not give accurate numerical results. They further identified the parameters through testing of prestressing steel to ASTM A417. This study further extended the work of Gales et al. Based on the steady state thermal creep and relaxation tests of prestressing steel to GB/T 5224 (Grade 1860) and BS 5896 (Grade 1860) over wide stress ranges, the parameters of Harmathy’s thermal creep model were identified and calibrated. Using the approach of Maljaars et al., the lower limit of tertiary creep was estimated and the creep model was further fine-tuned to incorporate tertiary creep. Numerical studies were conducted to examine the thermal creep and relaxation of prestressing steel at elevated temperatures using the enhanced creep model. The numerical predictions were found to agree well with the test results in respect of thermal creep and relaxation. In particular, predictions using the enhanced creep model with different sets of thermal creep parameters were compared with results of the thermal relaxation test conducted by MacLean, indicating different thermal creep resistance.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/237307
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 4.419
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.606
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWei, Y-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, L-
dc.contributor.authorAu, FTK-
dc.contributor.authorLi, J-
dc.contributor.authorTsang, NCM-
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-29T09:20:05Z-
dc.date.available2016-12-29T09:20:05Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationConstruction and Building Materials, 2016, v. 128, p. 118-127-
dc.identifier.issn0950-0618-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/237307-
dc.description.abstractThe thermal creep and relaxation of prestressing steel are crucial to the permanent loss of prestress in post-tensioned concrete structures after fire. Harmathy’s creep model is widely used to account for the irrecoverable thermal creep strain. In view of advances in steel manufacture, it is desirable to determine the relevant parameters of Harmathy’s creep model for common prestressing steel being used. Recently, Gales et al. found that the creep parameters obtained by Harmathy and Stanzak in the 1970s were out of date as the use of these parameters could not give accurate numerical results. They further identified the parameters through testing of prestressing steel to ASTM A417. This study further extended the work of Gales et al. Based on the steady state thermal creep and relaxation tests of prestressing steel to GB/T 5224 (Grade 1860) and BS 5896 (Grade 1860) over wide stress ranges, the parameters of Harmathy’s thermal creep model were identified and calibrated. Using the approach of Maljaars et al., the lower limit of tertiary creep was estimated and the creep model was further fine-tuned to incorporate tertiary creep. Numerical studies were conducted to examine the thermal creep and relaxation of prestressing steel at elevated temperatures using the enhanced creep model. The numerical predictions were found to agree well with the test results in respect of thermal creep and relaxation. In particular, predictions using the enhanced creep model with different sets of thermal creep parameters were compared with results of the thermal relaxation test conducted by MacLean, indicating different thermal creep resistance.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/conbuildmat-
dc.relation.ispartofConstruction and Building Materials-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectNumerical model-
dc.subjectPrestressing steel-
dc.subjectThermal creep-
dc.subjectThermal relaxation-
dc.titleThermal creep and relaxation of prestressing steel-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailAu, FTK: francis.au@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityAu, FTK=rp00083-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.conbuildmat.2016.10.068-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84992751180-
dc.identifier.hkuros270995-
dc.identifier.volume128-
dc.identifier.spage118-
dc.identifier.epage127-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000389089400012-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-
dc.identifier.issnl0950-0618-

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