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Article: Cryptic and cumulative impacts on the wintering habitat of the endangered black-faced spoonbill (Platalea minor) risk its long-term viability

TitleCryptic and cumulative impacts on the wintering habitat of the endangered black-faced spoonbill (Platalea minor) risk its long-term viability
Authors
Keywordsclimate change
endangered species
global warming
migration
tidal wetlands
Issue Date2018
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=ENC
Citation
Environmental Conservation, 2018, v. 45 n. 2, p. 147-154 How to Cite?
AbstractThe East Asian–Australasian flyway contains some of the most threatened habitats in the world, with at least 155 waterbird species reliant on the tidal habitats it comprises. The black-faced spoonbill (Platalea minor) is an iconic endangered species distributed across the coast of East Asia. Its population suffered a severe decline into the 1990s, but extensive monitoring and conservation interventions have aided a substantial recovery of the species. We used a population viability analysis based on data collected over the past two decades in conjunction with species distribution models to project spatially explicit models of population change for the next 35 years. Over nearly all scenarios of habitat loss and climate change, the global spoonbill population was projected to increase in the short-term due to low population numbers likely well below current population carrying capacities. However, climate change and habitat loss together threaten the recovery of the spoonbill population such that, by 2050, population declines are apparent as a consequence of these cumulative impacts. These threats are also cryptic and represent a challenge to the conservation of species recovering from anthropogenic impacts; observed population increases can hide large reductions in habitat suitability that threaten the long-term viability of species.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/246198
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 2.293
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.090
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPickett, EJ-
dc.contributor.authorChan, WSM-
dc.contributor.authorCheng, W-
dc.contributor.authorAllcock, JA-
dc.contributor.authorChan, S-
dc.contributor.authorHu, J-
dc.contributor.authorKisup, L-
dc.contributor.authorSmith, B-
dc.contributor.authorXing, S-
dc.contributor.authorYu, YT-
dc.contributor.authorBonebrake, TC-
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-18T02:24:16Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-18T02:24:16Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Conservation, 2018, v. 45 n. 2, p. 147-154-
dc.identifier.issn0376-8929-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/246198-
dc.description.abstractThe East Asian–Australasian flyway contains some of the most threatened habitats in the world, with at least 155 waterbird species reliant on the tidal habitats it comprises. The black-faced spoonbill (Platalea minor) is an iconic endangered species distributed across the coast of East Asia. Its population suffered a severe decline into the 1990s, but extensive monitoring and conservation interventions have aided a substantial recovery of the species. We used a population viability analysis based on data collected over the past two decades in conjunction with species distribution models to project spatially explicit models of population change for the next 35 years. Over nearly all scenarios of habitat loss and climate change, the global spoonbill population was projected to increase in the short-term due to low population numbers likely well below current population carrying capacities. However, climate change and habitat loss together threaten the recovery of the spoonbill population such that, by 2050, population declines are apparent as a consequence of these cumulative impacts. These threats are also cryptic and represent a challenge to the conservation of species recovering from anthropogenic impacts; observed population increases can hide large reductions in habitat suitability that threaten the long-term viability of species.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=ENC-
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Conservation-
dc.rightsEnvironmental Conservation. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.-
dc.rightsThis article has been published in a revised form in [Journal] [http://doi.org/XXX]. This version is free to view and download for private research and study only. Not for re-distribution, re-sale or use in derivative works. © copyright holder.-
dc.subjectclimate change-
dc.subjectendangered species-
dc.subjectglobal warming-
dc.subjectmigration-
dc.subjecttidal wetlands-
dc.titleCryptic and cumulative impacts on the wintering habitat of the endangered black-faced spoonbill (Platalea minor) risk its long-term viability-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailPickett, EJ: epickett@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailAllcock, JA: jallcock@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailBonebrake, TC: tbone@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityBonebrake, TC=rp01676-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0376892917000340-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85021263358-
dc.identifier.hkuros276349-
dc.identifier.volume45-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage147-
dc.identifier.epage154-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000432394500005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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