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Article: Awareness Versus Un-Clinging: Which Matters in Mindfulness?

TitleAwareness Versus Un-Clinging: Which Matters in Mindfulness?
Authors
Issue Date2017
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/14639947.asp
Citation
Contemporary Buddhism, 2017, v. 18 n. 2, p. 277-291 How to Cite?
AbstractAwareness and un-clinging have been emphasised in Buddhist discourse as important facets of mindfulness practice for over 2500 years. However, there is a lack of rigorous research examining the relationship between these two elements and their importance to well-being. To evaluate these abstract constructs, the current study adopted multiple assessment modalities; namely, a self-report scale, experience sampling (assessing ‘momentary mindfulness’), and semi-structured interviews (assessing ‘rater-rated mindfulness’). A total of 415 participants completed the questionnaire survey. Among them, 71 participants further took part in the experience sampling procedure and semi-structured interviews. The findings reveal that self-reported awareness was mildly correlated with momentary mindfulness (r = .35) but was not significantly correlated with rater-rated mindfulness. Self-reported un-clinging was moderately correlated with rater-rated mindfulness (r = .53) but was not significantly correlated with momentary mindfulness. Un-clinging, but not awareness, can distinguish meditators from non-meditators. Lastly, based on the Buddha’s mindfulness discourse, a path analysis model illustrates that the effects of un-clinging and awareness on stress reduction are mediated by emotional intelligence and non-attachment. Practical implications and future research designs are discussed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/247006
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.136
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNg, SM-
dc.contributor.authorChow, KW-
dc.contributor.authorLau, HP-
dc.contributor.authorWang, Q-
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-18T08:20:47Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-18T08:20:47Z-
dc.date.issued2017-
dc.identifier.citationContemporary Buddhism, 2017, v. 18 n. 2, p. 277-291-
dc.identifier.issn1463-9947-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/247006-
dc.description.abstractAwareness and un-clinging have been emphasised in Buddhist discourse as important facets of mindfulness practice for over 2500 years. However, there is a lack of rigorous research examining the relationship between these two elements and their importance to well-being. To evaluate these abstract constructs, the current study adopted multiple assessment modalities; namely, a self-report scale, experience sampling (assessing ‘momentary mindfulness’), and semi-structured interviews (assessing ‘rater-rated mindfulness’). A total of 415 participants completed the questionnaire survey. Among them, 71 participants further took part in the experience sampling procedure and semi-structured interviews. The findings reveal that self-reported awareness was mildly correlated with momentary mindfulness (r = .35) but was not significantly correlated with rater-rated mindfulness. Self-reported un-clinging was moderately correlated with rater-rated mindfulness (r = .53) but was not significantly correlated with momentary mindfulness. Un-clinging, but not awareness, can distinguish meditators from non-meditators. Lastly, based on the Buddha’s mindfulness discourse, a path analysis model illustrates that the effects of un-clinging and awareness on stress reduction are mediated by emotional intelligence and non-attachment. Practical implications and future research designs are discussed.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/14639947.asp-
dc.relation.ispartofContemporary Buddhism-
dc.rightsThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in Contemporary Buddhism: on 13 Sep 2017, available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14639947.2017.1374326-
dc.titleAwareness Versus Un-Clinging: Which Matters in Mindfulness?-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailNg, SM: ngsiuman@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLau, HP: hpbl@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityNg, SM=rp00611-
dc.identifier.authorityLau, HP=rp02055-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/14639947.2017.1374326-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85029448085-
dc.identifier.hkuros279665-
dc.identifier.volume18-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage277-
dc.identifier.epage291-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000423449500002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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