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Article: Priority Queuing on the Docket: Universality of Judicial Dispute Resolution Timing

TitlePriority Queuing on the Docket: Universality of Judicial Dispute Resolution Timing
Authors
Keywordsjudicial priority queuing
legal complex systems
empirical legal studies
judicial behavior
law as a natural phenomenon
Issue Date2018
PublisherFrontiers Research Foundation.
Citation
Frontiers in Physics, 2018, v. 6 n. 1, p. 1-7 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper analyzes court priority queuing behavior by examining the time lapse between when a case enters a court's docket and when it is ultimately disposed of. Using data from the Supreme courts of the United States, Massachusetts, and Canada we show that each court's docket features a slow decay with a decreasing tail. This demonstrates that, in each of the courts examined, the vast majority of cases are resolved relatively quickly, while there remains a small number of outlier cases that take an extremely long time to resolve. We discuss the implications for this on legal systems, the study of the law, and future research.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/251305
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.638
SSRN
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMukherjee, S-
dc.contributor.authorWhalen, RSM-
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-26T06:48:51Z-
dc.date.available2018-02-26T06:48:51Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Physics, 2018, v. 6 n. 1, p. 1-7-
dc.identifier.issn2296-424X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/251305-
dc.description.abstractThis paper analyzes court priority queuing behavior by examining the time lapse between when a case enters a court's docket and when it is ultimately disposed of. Using data from the Supreme courts of the United States, Massachusetts, and Canada we show that each court's docket features a slow decay with a decreasing tail. This demonstrates that, in each of the courts examined, the vast majority of cases are resolved relatively quickly, while there remains a small number of outlier cases that take an extremely long time to resolve. We discuss the implications for this on legal systems, the study of the law, and future research.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherFrontiers Research Foundation.-
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Physics-
dc.rightsThis Document is Protected by copyright and was first published by Frontiers. All rights reserved. It is reproduced with permission.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectjudicial priority queuing-
dc.subjectlegal complex systems-
dc.subjectempirical legal studies-
dc.subjectjudicial behavior-
dc.subjectlaw as a natural phenomenon-
dc.titlePriority Queuing on the Docket: Universality of Judicial Dispute Resolution Timing-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWhalen, RSM: whalen@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWhalen, RSM=rp02307-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fphy.2018.00001-
dc.identifier.hkuros285363-
dc.identifier.volume6-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage1-
dc.identifier.epage7-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000423190500001-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerland-
dc.identifier.ssrn3108474-
dc.identifier.hkulrp2018/011-

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