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Article: Cadherin- and Rigidity-Dependent Growth of Lung Cancer Cells in a Partially Confined Microenvironment

TitleCadherin- and Rigidity-Dependent Growth of Lung Cancer Cells in a Partially Confined Microenvironment
Authors
Keywordsrigidity-dependent cell growth
partial confinement
cell-cell contact
contact inhibition
Issue Date2018
Citation
ACS Biomaterials Science and Engineering, 2018, v. 4, n. 2, p. 446-455 How to Cite?
Abstract© 2017 American Chemical Society. During tumor development, cancer cells constantly confront different types of extracellular barriers. However, fundamental questions like whether tumor cells will continue to grow against confinement or away from it and what key factors govern this process remain poorly understood. To address these issues, here we examined the growth dynamics of human lung epithelial carcinoma A549 cells partially confined in micrometer-sized cylindrical pores with precisely controlled wall stiffness. It was found that, after reaching confluency, the cell monolayer enclosed by a compliant wall was able to keep growing and pushing the boundary, eventually leading to a markedly enlarged pore. In contrast, a much reduced in-plane growth and elevated strain level among cells were observed when the confining wall becomes stiff. Furthermore, under such circumstance, cells switched their growth from within the monolayer to along the out-of-plane direction, resulting in cell stacking. We showed that these observations can be well explained by a simple model taking into account the deformability of the wall and the threshold stress for inhibiting cell growth. Interestingly, cadherins were found to play an important role in the proliferation and stress buildup within the cell monolayer by aggregating at cell-cell junctions. The stiff confinement led to an elevated expression level of cadherins. Furthermore, inhibition of N-cadherin resulted in a significantly suppressed cell growth under the same confining conditions.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/251711
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHui, TH-
dc.contributor.authorTang, YH-
dc.contributor.authorYan, Z-
dc.contributor.authorYip, TC-
dc.contributor.authorFong, HW-
dc.contributor.authorCho, WC-
dc.contributor.authorNgan, KC-
dc.contributor.authorShum, HC-
dc.contributor.authorLin, Y-
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-08T05:00:45Z-
dc.date.available2018-03-08T05:00:45Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationACS Biomaterials Science and Engineering, 2018, v. 4, n. 2, p. 446-455-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/251711-
dc.description.abstract© 2017 American Chemical Society. During tumor development, cancer cells constantly confront different types of extracellular barriers. However, fundamental questions like whether tumor cells will continue to grow against confinement or away from it and what key factors govern this process remain poorly understood. To address these issues, here we examined the growth dynamics of human lung epithelial carcinoma A549 cells partially confined in micrometer-sized cylindrical pores with precisely controlled wall stiffness. It was found that, after reaching confluency, the cell monolayer enclosed by a compliant wall was able to keep growing and pushing the boundary, eventually leading to a markedly enlarged pore. In contrast, a much reduced in-plane growth and elevated strain level among cells were observed when the confining wall becomes stiff. Furthermore, under such circumstance, cells switched their growth from within the monolayer to along the out-of-plane direction, resulting in cell stacking. We showed that these observations can be well explained by a simple model taking into account the deformability of the wall and the threshold stress for inhibiting cell growth. Interestingly, cadherins were found to play an important role in the proliferation and stress buildup within the cell monolayer by aggregating at cell-cell junctions. The stiff confinement led to an elevated expression level of cadherins. Furthermore, inhibition of N-cadherin resulted in a significantly suppressed cell growth under the same confining conditions.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofACS Biomaterials Science and Engineering-
dc.subjectrigidity-dependent cell growth-
dc.subjectpartial confinement-
dc.subjectcell-cell contact-
dc.subjectcontact inhibition-
dc.titleCadherin- and Rigidity-Dependent Growth of Lung Cancer Cells in a Partially Confined Microenvironment-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/acsbiomaterials.7b00130-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85041918425-
dc.identifier.hkuros278678-
dc.identifier.volume4-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage446-
dc.identifier.epage455-
dc.identifier.eissn2373-9878-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000425194500016-

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