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Article: Chemotherapy-Induced Amenorrhea in Patients With Breast Cancer With a BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutation

TitleChemotherapy-Induced Amenorrhea in Patients With Breast Cancer With a BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutation
Authors
Issue Date2013
PublisherAmerican Society of Clinical Oncology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jco.org/
Citation
Journal of Clinical Oncology, 2013, v. 31, p. 3914-3919 How to Cite?
AbstractPURPOSE: To determine the likelihood of long-term amenorrhea after treatment with chemotherapy in women with breast cancer who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We conducted a multicenter survey of 1,954 young women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation who were treated for breast cancer. We included premenopausal women who were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 26 and 47 years of age. We determined the age of onset of amenorrhea after breast cancer for women who were and were not treated with chemotherapy, alone or with tamoxifen. We considered chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea to have occurred when the patient experienced ≥ 2 years of amenorrhea, commencing within 2 years of initiating chemotherapy, with no resumption of menses. RESULTS: Of the 1,426 women who received chemotherapy, 35% experienced long-term amenorrhea. Of the 528 women who did not receive chemotherapy, 5.3% developed long-term amenorrhea. The probabilities of chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea were 7.2% for women diagnosed before age 30 years, 33% for women age 31 to 44 years, and 79% for women diagnosed after age 45 years (P trend < .001). The probability of induced amenorrhea was higher for women who received tamoxifen than for those who did not (52% v 29%; P < .001). CONCLUSION: Age at treatment and use of tamoxifen are important predictors of chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea in women who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. The risk of induced long-term amenorrhea does not seem to be greater among mutation carriers than among women who do not carry a mutation.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/251821
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 32.956
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 9.204
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorValentini, A-
dc.contributor.authorFinch, A-
dc.contributor.authorLubiński, J-
dc.contributor.authorByrski, T-
dc.contributor.authorGhadirian, P-
dc.contributor.authorKim-Sing, C-
dc.contributor.authorLynch, HT-
dc.contributor.authorAinsworth, PJ-
dc.contributor.authorNeuhausen, SL-
dc.contributor.authorGreenblatt, E-
dc.contributor.authorSinger, C-
dc.contributor.authorSun, P-
dc.contributor.authorNarod, SA-
dc.contributor.authorKwong, A-
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-19T07:01:48Z-
dc.date.available2018-03-19T07:01:48Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Clinical Oncology, 2013, v. 31, p. 3914-3919-
dc.identifier.issn0732-183X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/251821-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: To determine the likelihood of long-term amenorrhea after treatment with chemotherapy in women with breast cancer who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We conducted a multicenter survey of 1,954 young women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation who were treated for breast cancer. We included premenopausal women who were diagnosed with invasive breast cancer between 26 and 47 years of age. We determined the age of onset of amenorrhea after breast cancer for women who were and were not treated with chemotherapy, alone or with tamoxifen. We considered chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea to have occurred when the patient experienced ≥ 2 years of amenorrhea, commencing within 2 years of initiating chemotherapy, with no resumption of menses. RESULTS: Of the 1,426 women who received chemotherapy, 35% experienced long-term amenorrhea. Of the 528 women who did not receive chemotherapy, 5.3% developed long-term amenorrhea. The probabilities of chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea were 7.2% for women diagnosed before age 30 years, 33% for women age 31 to 44 years, and 79% for women diagnosed after age 45 years (P trend < .001). The probability of induced amenorrhea was higher for women who received tamoxifen than for those who did not (52% v 29%; P < .001). CONCLUSION: Age at treatment and use of tamoxifen are important predictors of chemotherapy-induced amenorrhea in women who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. The risk of induced long-term amenorrhea does not seem to be greater among mutation carriers than among women who do not carry a mutation.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Clinical Oncology. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jco.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Oncology-
dc.titleChemotherapy-Induced Amenorrhea in Patients With Breast Cancer With a BRCA1 or BRCA2 Mutation-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailKwong, A: avakwong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityKwong, A=rp01734-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1200/JCO.2012.47.7893-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3805929-
dc.identifier.hkuros284576-
dc.identifier.volume31-
dc.identifier.spage3914-
dc.identifier.epage3919-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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