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Article: Do patients with and without a regular primary care physician have their psychological distress looked after differently?

TitleDo patients with and without a regular primary care physician have their psychological distress looked after differently?
Authors
KeywordsContinuity of care
Mental health
Primary care physician
Psychological distress
Issue Date2019
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://jpubhealth.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Journal of Public Health, 2019, v. 41 n. 2, p. 399-404 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: While qualitative studies suggested that continuity of care by primary care physicians (PCPs) facilitated consultations for psychological problems, there was limited quantitative evidence. This survey compared management of psychological distress between patients with and without a regular PCP. Methods: A questionnaire survey was conducted with 1626 adult primary care attenders from 13 private and 6 public clinics in Hong Kong. Management of psychological distress between respondents with a regular PCP and those without were compared. Effects of demographic factors were adjusted for by multivariable logistic regression. Results: Among the 1626 respondents, 650 (40.0%) reported that they had ever experienced psychological distress. Of the 650 respondents experienced distress, 307 (47.2%) had a regular PCP. A significantly higher proportion of patients with a regular PCP than those without reported: (i) their PCPs sometimes/often asked about psychological problems [37.7 versus 20.1%, adjusted OR = 2.241]; (ii) they sometimes/often mentioned their psychological problems to PCPs [45.2 versus 24.9%, adjusted OR = 2.503]; and (iii) their distress had been treated by PCPs [22.1 versus 13.4%, adjusted OR = 1.702]. Conclusion: Patients with a regular PCP have around double odds of receiving mental health care. Continuity of care by PCPs should be emphasized in mental health care delivery.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/258638
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 1.67
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.933

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSun, KS-
dc.contributor.authorLam, TP-
dc.contributor.authorLam, KF-
dc.contributor.authorLo, TL-
dc.contributor.authorChao, DVK-
dc.contributor.authorLam, WW-
dc.contributor.authorWu, DD-
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-22T01:41:40Z-
dc.date.available2018-08-22T01:41:40Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Public Health, 2019, v. 41 n. 2, p. 399-404-
dc.identifier.issn1741-3842-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/258638-
dc.description.abstractBackground: While qualitative studies suggested that continuity of care by primary care physicians (PCPs) facilitated consultations for psychological problems, there was limited quantitative evidence. This survey compared management of psychological distress between patients with and without a regular PCP. Methods: A questionnaire survey was conducted with 1626 adult primary care attenders from 13 private and 6 public clinics in Hong Kong. Management of psychological distress between respondents with a regular PCP and those without were compared. Effects of demographic factors were adjusted for by multivariable logistic regression. Results: Among the 1626 respondents, 650 (40.0%) reported that they had ever experienced psychological distress. Of the 650 respondents experienced distress, 307 (47.2%) had a regular PCP. A significantly higher proportion of patients with a regular PCP than those without reported: (i) their PCPs sometimes/often asked about psychological problems [37.7 versus 20.1%, adjusted OR = 2.241]; (ii) they sometimes/often mentioned their psychological problems to PCPs [45.2 versus 24.9%, adjusted OR = 2.503]; and (iii) their distress had been treated by PCPs [22.1 versus 13.4%, adjusted OR = 1.702]. Conclusion: Patients with a regular PCP have around double odds of receiving mental health care. Continuity of care by PCPs should be emphasized in mental health care delivery.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://jpubhealth.oxfordjournals.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Public Health-
dc.rightsThis is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in Journal of Public Health following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdy112-
dc.subjectContinuity of care-
dc.subjectMental health-
dc.subjectPrimary care physician-
dc.subjectPsychological distress-
dc.titleDo patients with and without a regular primary care physician have their psychological distress looked after differently?-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailSun, KS: kssun2@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, TP: tplam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, KF: hrntlkf@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLo, TL: lotl@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChao, DVK: dchku001@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, WW: wwlam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TP=rp00386-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KF=rp00718-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/pubmed/fdy112-
dc.identifier.pmid29982744-
dc.identifier.hkuros286592-
dc.identifier.volume41-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage399-
dc.identifier.epage404-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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