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Article: A review of food reformulation of baked products to reduce added sugar intake

TitleA review of food reformulation of baked products to reduce added sugar intake
Authors
KeywordsBaked product
Bulking agents
Dietary patterns
Health outcomes
Maltodextrins
Issue Date2019
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/tifs
Citation
Trends in Food Science & Technology, 2019, v. 86, p. 412-425 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Excessive consumption of added sugar is negatively associated with many health outcomes. Cakes and biscuits are popular discretionary foods that contribute significant amounts of added sugar to people's diets. Food reformulation may allow an efficient reduction in dietary sugar at a population level without shifting the individual's dietary pattern. Scope and approach: The aim of this review was to examine the literature on reformulation of baked products to reduce added sugar. Sucrose plays multiple vital roles in baked products, such as sweetness and bulking, and suitable substitutes must be able to address these functions. A range of potential sucrose substitutes are discussed. Key findings and conclusions: Polyols provide both bulk and sweetness though less than sucrose. Non-nutritive sweeteners (NNS) are commonly used in combination with polyols and bulking agents. Stevia, though with a noticeable metallic aftertaste, is the most studied NNS in baked products. Acesulfame-K, sucralose and encapsulated aspartame are also able to replace sucrose with low-calorie carbohydrates (oligofructose, maltodextrin and polydextrose) or polyols. This review indicates that maltitol seems the most suitable sole sucrose substitute at present, while diverse mixtures of NNS, polyols and low-calorie carbohydrates can also deliver the functionalities of sucrose in baked products.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/274291
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 11.077
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.267

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLuo, X-
dc.contributor.authorArcot, J-
dc.contributor.authorGill, T-
dc.contributor.authorLouie, JCY-
dc.contributor.authorRangan, A-
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-18T14:58:51Z-
dc.date.available2019-08-18T14:58:51Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationTrends in Food Science & Technology, 2019, v. 86, p. 412-425-
dc.identifier.issn0924-2244-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/274291-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Excessive consumption of added sugar is negatively associated with many health outcomes. Cakes and biscuits are popular discretionary foods that contribute significant amounts of added sugar to people's diets. Food reformulation may allow an efficient reduction in dietary sugar at a population level without shifting the individual's dietary pattern. Scope and approach: The aim of this review was to examine the literature on reformulation of baked products to reduce added sugar. Sucrose plays multiple vital roles in baked products, such as sweetness and bulking, and suitable substitutes must be able to address these functions. A range of potential sucrose substitutes are discussed. Key findings and conclusions: Polyols provide both bulk and sweetness though less than sucrose. Non-nutritive sweeteners (NNS) are commonly used in combination with polyols and bulking agents. Stevia, though with a noticeable metallic aftertaste, is the most studied NNS in baked products. Acesulfame-K, sucralose and encapsulated aspartame are also able to replace sucrose with low-calorie carbohydrates (oligofructose, maltodextrin and polydextrose) or polyols. This review indicates that maltitol seems the most suitable sole sucrose substitute at present, while diverse mixtures of NNS, polyols and low-calorie carbohydrates can also deliver the functionalities of sucrose in baked products.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/tifs-
dc.relation.ispartofTrends in Food Science & Technology-
dc.subjectBaked product-
dc.subjectBulking agents-
dc.subjectDietary patterns-
dc.subjectHealth outcomes-
dc.subjectMaltodextrins-
dc.titleA review of food reformulation of baked products to reduce added sugar intake-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLouie, JCY: jimmyl@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLouie, JCY=rp02118-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.tifs.2019.02.051-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85062297358-
dc.identifier.hkuros302036-
dc.identifier.volume86-
dc.identifier.spage412-
dc.identifier.epage425-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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