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Article: The association of problematic smartphone use with family well-being mediated by family communication in Chinese adults: A population-based study

TitleThe association of problematic smartphone use with family well-being mediated by family communication in Chinese adults: A population-based study
Authors
Keywordsproblematic smartphone use
family well-being
family communication
population-based study
Issue Date2019
PublisherAkademiai Kiado Rt..
Citation
Journal of Behavioral Addictions, 2019 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground and aims Few studies have investigated the effects of problematic smartphone use (PSU) in the family context. We studied the association of PSU as a predictor with family well-being and the potential mediating role of family communication in Hong Kong Chinese adults. Methods We analyzed data of 5,063 randomly selected adults [mean age (SD) = 48.1 (18.2) years; 45.0% men] from a dual landline and mobile telephone survey in 2017. PSU was assessed by the Smartphone Addiction Scale-Short Version with higher scores indicating higher levels. Family well-being was assessed by three questions on perceived family health, harmony, and happiness (3Hs) with higher scores indicating greater well-being. Perceived sufficiency and quality of family communication were rated. Multivariable regression analyses examined (a) associations of PSU with family 3Hs and well-being and (b) mediating role of family communication, adjusting for sociodemographic variables. Results PSU was negatively associated with perceived family health (adjusted β = −0.008, 95% CI = −0.016, −0.0004), harmony (adjusted β = −0.009, 95% CI = −0.017, −0.002), happiness (adjusted β = −0.015, 95% CI = −0.022, −0.007), and well-being (adjusted β = −0.011, 95% CI = −0.018, −0.004). Perceived family communication sufficiency (adjusted β = −0.007, 95% CI = −0.010, −0.005) and quality (adjusted β = −0.009, 95% CI = −0.014, −0.005) mediated the association of PSU with family well-being, with 75% and 94% of total effects having mediated, respectively. Discussion and conclusions PSU was negatively associated with family well-being, which was partially mediated by family communication. Such findings provide insights for health programs to prevent PSU and improve family well-being.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/274519
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 5.143
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.933

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGuo, N-
dc.contributor.authorWang, MP-
dc.contributor.authorLuk, TT-
dc.contributor.authorHo, DSY-
dc.contributor.authorFong, DYT-
dc.contributor.authorChan, SSC-
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH-
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-18T15:03:17Z-
dc.date.available2019-08-18T15:03:17Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Behavioral Addictions, 2019-
dc.identifier.issn2062-5871-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/274519-
dc.description.abstractBackground and aims Few studies have investigated the effects of problematic smartphone use (PSU) in the family context. We studied the association of PSU as a predictor with family well-being and the potential mediating role of family communication in Hong Kong Chinese adults. Methods We analyzed data of 5,063 randomly selected adults [mean age (SD) = 48.1 (18.2) years; 45.0% men] from a dual landline and mobile telephone survey in 2017. PSU was assessed by the Smartphone Addiction Scale-Short Version with higher scores indicating higher levels. Family well-being was assessed by three questions on perceived family health, harmony, and happiness (3Hs) with higher scores indicating greater well-being. Perceived sufficiency and quality of family communication were rated. Multivariable regression analyses examined (a) associations of PSU with family 3Hs and well-being and (b) mediating role of family communication, adjusting for sociodemographic variables. Results PSU was negatively associated with perceived family health (adjusted β = −0.008, 95% CI = −0.016, −0.0004), harmony (adjusted β = −0.009, 95% CI = −0.017, −0.002), happiness (adjusted β = −0.015, 95% CI = −0.022, −0.007), and well-being (adjusted β = −0.011, 95% CI = −0.018, −0.004). Perceived family communication sufficiency (adjusted β = −0.007, 95% CI = −0.010, −0.005) and quality (adjusted β = −0.009, 95% CI = −0.014, −0.005) mediated the association of PSU with family well-being, with 75% and 94% of total effects having mediated, respectively. Discussion and conclusions PSU was negatively associated with family well-being, which was partially mediated by family communication. Such findings provide insights for health programs to prevent PSU and improve family well-being.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAkademiai Kiado Rt..-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Behavioral Addictions-
dc.rightsThe file is not the final published version of the paper. AND quote the correct citation and enclose a link to the published paper: http://dx.doi.org/ DOI of the Article.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectproblematic smartphone use-
dc.subjectfamily well-being-
dc.subjectfamily communication-
dc.subjectpopulation-based study-
dc.titleThe association of problematic smartphone use with family well-being mediated by family communication in Chinese adults: A population-based study-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWang, MP: mpwang@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHo, DSY: syho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFong, DYT: dytfong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, SSC: scsophia@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWang, MP=rp01863-
dc.identifier.authorityHo, DSY=rp00427-
dc.identifier.authorityFong, DYT=rp00253-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, SSC=rp00423-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1556/2006.8.2019.39-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85072848483-
dc.identifier.hkuros301324-
dc.publisher.placeHungary-

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