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Article: The Hong Kong Survey on the Epidemiology of Trauma Exposure and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

TitleThe Hong Kong Survey on the Epidemiology of Trauma Exposure and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
Authors
Issue Date2019
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/109882595
Citation
Journal of Traumatic Stress, 2019, v. 32 n. 5, p. 664-676 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study examined the epidemiology of trauma exposure (TE) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among community-dwelling Chinese adults in Hong Kong. Multistage stratification sampling design was used, and 5,377 participants were included. In Phase 1, TE, probable PTSD (p-PTSD), and psychiatric comorbid conditions were examined. In Phase 2, the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV (SCID-I) was used to determine the weighted diagnostic prevalence of lifetime full PTSD. Disability level and health service utilization were studied. The findings showed that the weighted prevalence of TE was 64.8%, and increased to 88.7% when indirect TE types were included, with transportation accidents (50.8%) reported as the most common TE. The prevalence of current p-PTSD among participants with TE was 2.9%. Results of logistic regression suggested that nine specific trauma types were significantly associated with p-PTSD; among this group, severe human suffering, sexual assault, unwanted or uncomfortable sexual experience, captivity, and sudden and violent death carried the greatest risks for developing PTSD, odds ratio (OR) = 2.32–2.69. The occurrence of p-PTSD was associated with more mental health burdens, including (a) sixfold higher rates for any past-week common mental disorder, OR = 28.4, (b) more mental health service utilization, p <.001, (c) poorer mental health indexes in level of symptomatology, suicide ideation and functioning, p <.001, and (d) more disability, ps <.001–p =.014. The associations found among TE, PTSD, and health service utilization suggest that both TE and PTSD should be considered public health concerns. © 2019 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/275149
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 1.926
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.420
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, SMC-
dc.contributor.authorWu, KK-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, PWL-
dc.contributor.authorWong, CSM-
dc.contributor.authorYu, PMW-
dc.contributor.authorWong, RMF-
dc.contributor.authorWong, PPS-
dc.contributor.authorLui, JCC-
dc.contributor.authorNgan, JCF-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, FLT-
dc.contributor.authorLam, LCW-
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-10T02:36:32Z-
dc.date.available2019-09-10T02:36:32Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Traumatic Stress, 2019, v. 32 n. 5, p. 664-676-
dc.identifier.issn0894-9867-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/275149-
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the epidemiology of trauma exposure (TE) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among community-dwelling Chinese adults in Hong Kong. Multistage stratification sampling design was used, and 5,377 participants were included. In Phase 1, TE, probable PTSD (p-PTSD), and psychiatric comorbid conditions were examined. In Phase 2, the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV (SCID-I) was used to determine the weighted diagnostic prevalence of lifetime full PTSD. Disability level and health service utilization were studied. The findings showed that the weighted prevalence of TE was 64.8%, and increased to 88.7% when indirect TE types were included, with transportation accidents (50.8%) reported as the most common TE. The prevalence of current p-PTSD among participants with TE was 2.9%. Results of logistic regression suggested that nine specific trauma types were significantly associated with p-PTSD; among this group, severe human suffering, sexual assault, unwanted or uncomfortable sexual experience, captivity, and sudden and violent death carried the greatest risks for developing PTSD, odds ratio (OR) = 2.32–2.69. The occurrence of p-PTSD was associated with more mental health burdens, including (a) sixfold higher rates for any past-week common mental disorder, OR = 28.4, (b) more mental health service utilization, p <.001, (c) poorer mental health indexes in level of symptomatology, suicide ideation and functioning, p <.001, and (d) more disability, ps <.001–p =.014. The associations found among TE, PTSD, and health service utilization suggest that both TE and PTSD should be considered public health concerns. © 2019 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/109882595-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Traumatic Stress-
dc.rightsPreprint This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. Postprint This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.titleThe Hong Kong Survey on the Epidemiology of Trauma Exposure and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWong, SMC: wongcsm@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/jts.22430-
dc.identifier.pmid31393657-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85070696071-
dc.identifier.hkuros303145-
dc.identifier.volume32-
dc.identifier.issue5-
dc.identifier.spage664-
dc.identifier.epage676-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000481151200001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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