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Article: Assessing Spatial Accessibility to Medical Resources at the Community Level in Shenzhen, China

TitleAssessing Spatial Accessibility to Medical Resources at the Community Level in Shenzhen, China
Authors
Keywordsspatial accessibility
general hospital
medical resource
E2SFCA
Shenzhen
Issue Date2019
PublisherMolecular Diversity Preservation International. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mdpi.org/ijerph
Citation
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 2019, v. 16 n. 2, p. article no. 242 How to Cite?
AbstractSpatial accessibility to medical resources is an integral component of universal health coverage. However, research evaluating the spatial accessibility of healthcare services at the community level in China remains limited. We assessed the community-level spatial access to beds, doctors, and nurses at general hospitals and identified the shortage areas in Shenzhen, one of the fastest growing cities in China. Based on hospital and population data from 2016, spatial accessibility was analyzed using several methods: shortest path analysis, Gini coefficient, and enhanced 2-step floating catchment area (E2SFCA). The study found that 99.9% of the residents in Shenzhen could get to the nearest general hospital within 30 min. Healthcare supply was much more equitable between populations than across communities in the city. E2SFCA scores showed that the communities with the best and worst hospital accessibility were found in the southwest and southeast of the city, respectively. State-owned public hospitals still dominated the medical resources supply market and there was a clear spatial accessibility disparity between private and public healthcare resources. The E2SFCA scores supplement more details about resource disparity over space than do crude provider-to-population ratios (PPR) and can help improve the efficiency of the distribution of medical resources.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/275463
ISSN
2011 Impact Factor: 1.605
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.883
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhu, L-
dc.contributor.authorZhong, S-
dc.contributor.authorTu, W-
dc.contributor.authorZheng, J-
dc.contributor.authorHe, S-
dc.contributor.authorBao, J-
dc.contributor.authorHuang, C-
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-10T02:43:04Z-
dc.date.available2019-09-10T02:43:04Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 2019, v. 16 n. 2, p. article no. 242-
dc.identifier.issn1661-7827-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/275463-
dc.description.abstractSpatial accessibility to medical resources is an integral component of universal health coverage. However, research evaluating the spatial accessibility of healthcare services at the community level in China remains limited. We assessed the community-level spatial access to beds, doctors, and nurses at general hospitals and identified the shortage areas in Shenzhen, one of the fastest growing cities in China. Based on hospital and population data from 2016, spatial accessibility was analyzed using several methods: shortest path analysis, Gini coefficient, and enhanced 2-step floating catchment area (E2SFCA). The study found that 99.9% of the residents in Shenzhen could get to the nearest general hospital within 30 min. Healthcare supply was much more equitable between populations than across communities in the city. E2SFCA scores showed that the communities with the best and worst hospital accessibility were found in the southwest and southeast of the city, respectively. State-owned public hospitals still dominated the medical resources supply market and there was a clear spatial accessibility disparity between private and public healthcare resources. The E2SFCA scores supplement more details about resource disparity over space than do crude provider-to-population ratios (PPR) and can help improve the efficiency of the distribution of medical resources.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherMolecular Diversity Preservation International. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mdpi.org/ijerph-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectspatial accessibility-
dc.subjectgeneral hospital-
dc.subjectmedical resource-
dc.subjectE2SFCA-
dc.subjectShenzhen-
dc.titleAssessing Spatial Accessibility to Medical Resources at the Community Level in Shenzhen, China-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailHe, S: sjhe@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHe, S=rp01996-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph16020242-
dc.identifier.pmid30654500-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC6352203-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85060130520-
dc.identifier.hkuros305247-
dc.identifier.volume16-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 242-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 242-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerland-

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