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Book Chapter: Implications of Social Neuroscience for Learning Technology Research and Development

TitleImplications of Social Neuroscience for Learning Technology Research and Development
Authors
KeywordsSocial neuroscience
Social robots
Serious games
Collaborative problem-solving
In-game assessment
Issue Date2019
PublisherSpringer
Citation
Implications of Social Neuroscience for Learning Technology Research and Development. In Parsons, TD, Lin, L, and Cockerham, D (Eds.), Mind, Brain and Technology: Learning in the Age of Emerging Technologies, p. 161-176. Cham: Springer, 2019 How to Cite?
AbstractNeuroscientific research has unequivocally pointed to the deeply social nature of human learning. Learning at the cognitive behavioral level is underpinned by neurophysiological changes in brain structure and connectivity across different parts of the brain as the learner interacts with others and the environment. Studies of epigenetic processes show that learning is dynamic, requiring learner engagement and contingent feedback. Agency, contingency and appropriate feedback are also keys to learning effectiveness at higher cognitive levels. The field of instructional design has traditionally focused on supporting the instructor, built on a model of learning as receiving instructions. Based on learning outcomes that are important for learners in the twenty-first century (communication, collaboration, creativity, critical thinking, and global competence), this model of learning support is outdated and irrelevant. This chapter begins with a review of key research directions in the deployment of technology-enhanced learning for infants and children based on neuroscience research, with a focus on social robots and serious games. It then reviews the challenges in the assessment and provision of learning support for collaborative problem-solving. The chapter ends by identifying some research directions for interdisciplinary collaboration among researchers in learning/instructional design and the science of learning that will help to advance theory and educational practice in collaborative problem-solving.
DescriptionEducational Communications and Technology: Issues and Innovations
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/275643
ISBN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLaw, NWY-
dc.contributor.authorTsang, WC-
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-10T02:46:42Z-
dc.date.available2019-09-10T02:46:42Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationImplications of Social Neuroscience for Learning Technology Research and Development. In Parsons, TD, Lin, L, and Cockerham, D (Eds.), Mind, Brain and Technology: Learning in the Age of Emerging Technologies, p. 161-176. Cham: Springer, 2019-
dc.identifier.isbn9783030026301-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/275643-
dc.descriptionEducational Communications and Technology: Issues and Innovations-
dc.description.abstractNeuroscientific research has unequivocally pointed to the deeply social nature of human learning. Learning at the cognitive behavioral level is underpinned by neurophysiological changes in brain structure and connectivity across different parts of the brain as the learner interacts with others and the environment. Studies of epigenetic processes show that learning is dynamic, requiring learner engagement and contingent feedback. Agency, contingency and appropriate feedback are also keys to learning effectiveness at higher cognitive levels. The field of instructional design has traditionally focused on supporting the instructor, built on a model of learning as receiving instructions. Based on learning outcomes that are important for learners in the twenty-first century (communication, collaboration, creativity, critical thinking, and global competence), this model of learning support is outdated and irrelevant. This chapter begins with a review of key research directions in the deployment of technology-enhanced learning for infants and children based on neuroscience research, with a focus on social robots and serious games. It then reviews the challenges in the assessment and provision of learning support for collaborative problem-solving. The chapter ends by identifying some research directions for interdisciplinary collaboration among researchers in learning/instructional design and the science of learning that will help to advance theory and educational practice in collaborative problem-solving.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer-
dc.relation.ispartofMind, Brain and Technology: Learning in the Age of Emerging Technologies-
dc.subjectSocial neuroscience-
dc.subjectSocial robots-
dc.subjectSerious games-
dc.subjectCollaborative problem-solving-
dc.subjectIn-game assessment-
dc.titleImplications of Social Neuroscience for Learning Technology Research and Development-
dc.typeBook_Chapter-
dc.identifier.emailLaw, NWY: nlaw@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLaw, NWY=rp00919-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-3-030-02631-8_9-
dc.identifier.hkuros304279-
dc.identifier.spage161-
dc.identifier.epage176-
dc.publisher.placeCham-

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