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Article: Time-Frequency Delta Activity to Social Feedback Demonstrates Differential Associations With Depression and Social Anxiety Symptoms

TitleTime-Frequency Delta Activity to Social Feedback Demonstrates Differential Associations With Depression and Social Anxiety Symptoms
Authors
KeywordsTime-frequency
Delta
Theta
Social feedback processing
Social anxiety
Depression
Issue Date2019
PublisherFrontiers Research Foundation. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.frontiersin.org/behavioral_neuroscience/
Citation
Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 2019, v. 13, article no. 189 How to Cite?
AbstractSocial feedback is highly salient and particularly relevant when investigating the pathophysiology of depression and social anxiety. A bourgeoning body of research has demonstrated an association between reward-related delta activity and psychopathology. However, a critical limitation is that these findings are derived from neural responses to monetary feedback, and time-frequency representation of social feedback remains unexplored. In addition, no study has isolated the differential/unique associations of positive valence and the intrinsic rewarding experience of being correct with reward-related neural activity. In the present study, 204 participants underwent electroencephalography (EEG) while they completed a novel paradigm comprised of monetary and social feedback tasks that were matched in trial structure, timing, and feedback stimuli. For each task, participants were instructed to correctly identify one of two doors that would provide positive feedback (monetary win behind the door) or one of two peers who would provide positive feedback (social like); or to correctly identify the door or peer that would provide negative feedback (money loss behind the door/social dislike). A principal component analysis (PCA) was conducted on the time-frequency data and revealed two factors in the delta and one factor in the theta frequency ranges. Results indicated that the lower-frequency delta factor (delta-low) was greater to correct vs. incorrect feedback, more so for social vs. monetary tasks, while the higher-frequency delta factor (delta-high) was greater to correct vs. incorrect feedback for social like, social dislike, and monetary win tasks, but not the monetary loss task. In contrast, the theta factor was greater to incorrect relative to correct feedback in negative valence (lose money/social dislike) but not positive valence (win money/social like) tasks. Furthermore, greater delta-high activity for social feedback was associated with greater social anxiety symptoms, whereas lesser delta-high activity for social feedback was associated with greater depressive symptoms. Finally, greater theta activity to monetary feedback was associated with greater depressive symptoms. The present study provides novel evidence demonstrating unique social vs. monetary feedback-related delta and theta activity, and differential associations between delta activity with depression and social anxiety symptoms. These findings highlight the importance of investigating feedback-related neural responses in the social domain.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/278538
ISSN
2017 Impact Factor: 3.138
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.803
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorJin, J-
dc.contributor.authorSabharwal, A-
dc.contributor.authorInfantolino, ZP-
dc.contributor.authorJarcho, JM-
dc.contributor.authorNelson, BD-
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-11T03:23:52Z-
dc.date.available2019-10-11T03:23:52Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 2019, v. 13, article no. 189-
dc.identifier.issn1662-5153-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/278538-
dc.description.abstractSocial feedback is highly salient and particularly relevant when investigating the pathophysiology of depression and social anxiety. A bourgeoning body of research has demonstrated an association between reward-related delta activity and psychopathology. However, a critical limitation is that these findings are derived from neural responses to monetary feedback, and time-frequency representation of social feedback remains unexplored. In addition, no study has isolated the differential/unique associations of positive valence and the intrinsic rewarding experience of being correct with reward-related neural activity. In the present study, 204 participants underwent electroencephalography (EEG) while they completed a novel paradigm comprised of monetary and social feedback tasks that were matched in trial structure, timing, and feedback stimuli. For each task, participants were instructed to correctly identify one of two doors that would provide positive feedback (monetary win behind the door) or one of two peers who would provide positive feedback (social like); or to correctly identify the door or peer that would provide negative feedback (money loss behind the door/social dislike). A principal component analysis (PCA) was conducted on the time-frequency data and revealed two factors in the delta and one factor in the theta frequency ranges. Results indicated that the lower-frequency delta factor (delta-low) was greater to correct vs. incorrect feedback, more so for social vs. monetary tasks, while the higher-frequency delta factor (delta-high) was greater to correct vs. incorrect feedback for social like, social dislike, and monetary win tasks, but not the monetary loss task. In contrast, the theta factor was greater to incorrect relative to correct feedback in negative valence (lose money/social dislike) but not positive valence (win money/social like) tasks. Furthermore, greater delta-high activity for social feedback was associated with greater social anxiety symptoms, whereas lesser delta-high activity for social feedback was associated with greater depressive symptoms. Finally, greater theta activity to monetary feedback was associated with greater depressive symptoms. The present study provides novel evidence demonstrating unique social vs. monetary feedback-related delta and theta activity, and differential associations between delta activity with depression and social anxiety symptoms. These findings highlight the importance of investigating feedback-related neural responses in the social domain.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherFrontiers Research Foundation. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.frontiersin.org/behavioral_neuroscience/-
dc.relation.ispartofFrontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectTime-frequency-
dc.subjectDelta-
dc.subjectTheta-
dc.subjectSocial feedback processing-
dc.subjectSocial anxiety-
dc.subjectDepression-
dc.titleTime-Frequency Delta Activity to Social Feedback Demonstrates Differential Associations With Depression and Social Anxiety Symptoms-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailJin, J: jinfranj@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityJin, J=rp02610-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fnbeh.2019.00189-
dc.identifier.pmid31507387-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC6718448-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85072727202-
dc.identifier.volume13-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 189-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 189-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000482810400003-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerland-

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