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Article: Gender Inequality and Suicide Gender Ratios in the World

TitleGender Inequality and Suicide Gender Ratios in the World
Authors
KeywordsGender inequality
Global analyses
Sex ratios at birth
Suicide gender ratios
Women's resilience
Issue Date2019
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jad
Citation
Journal of Affective Disorders, 2019, v. 243, p. 297-304 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: To assess whether gender inequality determines the patterns of suicide gender ratios. METHODS: Using suicide data obtained from the World Health Organization Statistical Information System, 2012, suicide gender ratios were calculated and a world map of the ratios constructed. Forest plots were utilized to assess whether gender inequality (indicated by the Gender Inequality Index ['GII'] and male to female sex ratios at birth) moderated the worldwide patterns of suicide gender ratios. Regression analyses were then performed to estimate the extent to which gender inequality affects suicide gender ratios before and after controlling for human development level ('HDI'). RESULTS: Gradient relationships of suicide gender ratios across 3 tertiles of GII were observed (ratios = 2.03, 2.54, 3.51, respectively for high, moderate and low GII, P = 0.03). High sex ratio at birth was significantly associated with lower suicide gender ratio (ratio = 1.64 vs. 2.75, P = 0.00). Regression analyses showed that highest tertile of GII and high sex ratios at birth were significantly associated with lower suicide gender ratios (P = 0.00 and P = 0.00, respectively). When the level of human development level was controlled, high sex ratio at birth remained to be a significant determinant of suicide gender ratios (P = 0.00), whereas the significance of GII disappeared (P = 0.19). LIMITATIONS: The cross-sectional data do not allow for causal inferences. CONCLUSIONS: Male to female suicide ratios were higher in countries with more egalitarian gender norms. Strategies to eliminate culturally embedded gender discrimination have the potentials to prevent suicides.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/278637
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 3.892
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.927

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCHANG, Q-
dc.contributor.authorYip, PSF-
dc.contributor.authorChen, Y-Y-
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-21T02:11:16Z-
dc.date.available2019-10-21T02:11:16Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Affective Disorders, 2019, v. 243, p. 297-304-
dc.identifier.issn0165-0327-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/278637-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: To assess whether gender inequality determines the patterns of suicide gender ratios. METHODS: Using suicide data obtained from the World Health Organization Statistical Information System, 2012, suicide gender ratios were calculated and a world map of the ratios constructed. Forest plots were utilized to assess whether gender inequality (indicated by the Gender Inequality Index ['GII'] and male to female sex ratios at birth) moderated the worldwide patterns of suicide gender ratios. Regression analyses were then performed to estimate the extent to which gender inequality affects suicide gender ratios before and after controlling for human development level ('HDI'). RESULTS: Gradient relationships of suicide gender ratios across 3 tertiles of GII were observed (ratios = 2.03, 2.54, 3.51, respectively for high, moderate and low GII, P = 0.03). High sex ratio at birth was significantly associated with lower suicide gender ratio (ratio = 1.64 vs. 2.75, P = 0.00). Regression analyses showed that highest tertile of GII and high sex ratios at birth were significantly associated with lower suicide gender ratios (P = 0.00 and P = 0.00, respectively). When the level of human development level was controlled, high sex ratio at birth remained to be a significant determinant of suicide gender ratios (P = 0.00), whereas the significance of GII disappeared (P = 0.19). LIMITATIONS: The cross-sectional data do not allow for causal inferences. CONCLUSIONS: Male to female suicide ratios were higher in countries with more egalitarian gender norms. Strategies to eliminate culturally embedded gender discrimination have the potentials to prevent suicides.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jad-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Affective Disorders-
dc.subjectGender inequality-
dc.subjectGlobal analyses-
dc.subjectSex ratios at birth-
dc.subjectSuicide gender ratios-
dc.subjectWomen's resilience-
dc.titleGender Inequality and Suicide Gender Ratios in the World-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailYip, PSF: sfpyip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYip, PSF=rp00596-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jad.2018.09.032-
dc.identifier.pmid30261445-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85053796216-
dc.identifier.hkuros308053-
dc.identifier.volume243-
dc.identifier.spage297-
dc.identifier.epage304-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

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