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Article: China–US trade: implications on conflicts

TitleChina–US trade: implications on conflicts
Authors
KeywordsTrade war
trade friction
China–U.S. trade
Issue Date2019
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rcej20/current
Citation
China Economic Journal, 2019, v. 12 n. 2, p. 175-194 How to Cite?
AbstractIn this study, we examine various aspects of China’s trade, the U.S.’ trade, and the bilateral trade between the two countries. The analysis of each aspect has direct and indirect implications on trade conflicts between the two countries. We focus on important factors, such as the growth of trade, import penetration, increased competitiveness of Chinese firms, comparative advantages of Chinese goods, China’s WTO entry and its compliance, and bilateral trade imbalance. While each of the factors can lead to trade frictions, individual factors will not have led to a large-scale trade war. These factors converge within a brief period and thus can be considered the China shock, thereby making other countries’ adjustments to their economic structures difficult. Therefore, trade frictions are inevitable.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/278979
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.152

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorQiu, LD-
dc.contributor.authorWEI, X-
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-21T02:17:24Z-
dc.date.available2019-10-21T02:17:24Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationChina Economic Journal, 2019, v. 12 n. 2, p. 175-194-
dc.identifier.issn1753-8963-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/278979-
dc.description.abstractIn this study, we examine various aspects of China’s trade, the U.S.’ trade, and the bilateral trade between the two countries. The analysis of each aspect has direct and indirect implications on trade conflicts between the two countries. We focus on important factors, such as the growth of trade, import penetration, increased competitiveness of Chinese firms, comparative advantages of Chinese goods, China’s WTO entry and its compliance, and bilateral trade imbalance. While each of the factors can lead to trade frictions, individual factors will not have led to a large-scale trade war. These factors converge within a brief period and thus can be considered the China shock, thereby making other countries’ adjustments to their economic structures difficult. Therefore, trade frictions are inevitable.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rcej20/current-
dc.relation.ispartofChina Economic Journal-
dc.rightsPreprint: This is an Author's Original Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in [JOURNAL TITLE] on [date of publication], available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/[Article DOI]. Postprint: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis Group in [JOURNAL TITLE] on [date of publication], available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/[Article DOI].-
dc.subjectTrade war-
dc.subjecttrade friction-
dc.subjectChina–U.S. trade-
dc.titleChina–US trade: implications on conflicts-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailQiu, LD: larryqiu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityQiu, LD=rp01093-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/17538963.2019.1598014-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85063729162-
dc.identifier.hkuros307606-
dc.identifier.volume12-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage175-
dc.identifier.epage194-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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